Service vans deliver community service

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11/19/2010

I’ve learned in my time writing about the industry that many security companies help the public in ways that range from teaching kids what to do if there’s a fire to raising funds for earthquake victims in Haiti.

Here’s another example of company helping out, with a bit of a different twist: Vector Security is using its service vans as roving billboards to provide a community service.

The Pittsburgh-based company made a commitment in July to sponsor Project Home Again, which aims to help return missing and kidnapped children to their parents through a public awareness effort. The campaign involves displaying posters of the children on service vehicles used by participating companies. Vector put the posters on its fleet of nearly 300 service vans and uniformed guard and patrol vehicles in the Mid-Atlantic States, and Ohio, Florida and California, the company said.

Now, just four months later, the company announced this week, six children whose posters were displayed on Vector Security vans have been recovered. 

During the first week of November, two Ohio children pictured on Vector vehicles were returned home safely, the company said.

Next, a Florida girl and Pennsylvania girl and two California siblings whose photos had been on company vans were recovered, according to the company.

Pamela Petrow, president and CEO of Vector, said the news illustrates the value of the project, which was championed by John Murphy, the company’s former leader, who passed away in October. “John stressed that Vector’s support of Project Home Again tied directly into his core corporate values,” Petrow said in a statement. She added, “John would be overjoyed by the news that one of his favorite public advocacy programs has worked so well to help preserve the lives and hopefully the futures of these children.”

Jennifer Holloway, president of the Dallas-based Holloway Security Consulting, summed up Vector’s program nicely in a recent Twitter comment: “Awesome use of service trucks,” she wrote. “We should all be thankful for companies who look for ways to help their communities.”