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by: Daniel Gelinas - Friday, August 20, 2010
verizon-logo-470x3101I blogged a little while ago about the possible entrance of Verizon into the security and PERS spaces. Granted, I’ve received no press from Verizon on the matter, but why else would they be co-sponsoring the upcoming mHealth summit? And why else would I have shared an ESX elevator and a cryptic conversation in Pittsburgh (”Hey there Ms. Verizon, what’re you guys doing at a security trade show?” … “Oh, we’re just seeing what’s up…”) with a member of Verizon’s Market Research & Strategy Development team?

It piqued my interest and I traded cards with Ms. Verizon. My first blogging on Verizon’s seeming security/PERS forays sparked some interest from readers in the form of comments and a LinkedIn Group discussion initiated by IPAlarmsSteve Nutt. After reading through those comments and the discussion I reached out to Alana again and heard back from her not too long after.

Hi Dan.  Not able to share any information with you right now unfortunately.  I’ll keep you in my Contacts though.  Thanks.

Hmmm… That sounds to me like when you ask someone if a rumor is true and they say they can’t comment… almost always means the rumor is true. Sounds like they’re definitely moving in. It only remains to be seen in what capacity.

Here’s some of what transpired in the LinkedIn discussion:

I just read about this on Security Systems News and although it is a big WAKE UP call, I feel more disappointment than surprise. Alarm & PERS dealers should have this sewn up so tight that outsiders looking in would see zero opportunity.

Sadly that’s not the case and it is looking increasingly like many alarm dealers will sit back and watch as their customers unplug their landlines and send in their cancellation notices.

If you do the math, we are already at the stage where it is no longer possible for the number of technical people employed in our industry to migrate each and every analog system to IP/GSM before the telco’s pull the PSTN plug.

Interesting… You see where this is going… Telco’s control the old infrastructure and have branched out into the new infrastructure… The government ultimately will mandate when the PSTN no longer needs to be maintained, but the telcos have sway.

Steve continues, pointing out telco’s ability to neatly invade the space.

Approx 1 million new systems are installed each year in North America and the industry bases their number of employees around that figure. How then, if we allow 5 years for a POTS sunset, can these guys also upgrade 30 million analog systems at a rate of 6 million a year?

They can’t. Verizon know that. Other tech companies know that. The difference is, they have the people to carry out those upgrades, and unlike the alarm industry, they understand IP.

Steve discusses the amount of money we’re dealing with here and points out that there may not be time to sit around getting comfortable with IP.

I speak to Central Station staff every day of the week and I know for sure that less than 1% of today’s monitored subscriber base is using IP. It’s almost like IP just popped up a couple of months back and with it being so new, the industry is keeping an eye on it for a while before deciding whether or not they should use it.

The Geek Squad have no such fears of IP. Do you know how easy it is for those guys to go into a home, unplug the panel from the POTS line, plug an RJ11 cable into an IP Alarm device, plug into a router and walk away with your RMR?

They don’t even need to look at the alarm panel or concern themselves with what phone number it dials or what protocol it transmits. The IP device handles all of that and sends the signal to where it needs to go.

The way I see it (and apparently the way Verizon and others see it) is that even when you take existing lock-in contracts into account, there is US$600 million worth of alarm monitoring RMR up for grabs over the next five years ($20 average RMR times 30 million accounts). Even my wife doesn’t spend that much on her credit card, so it’s not to be sniffed at.

Steve’s initial post prompted a reply and a discussion was born.

Simon Cross from Becatech in the UK said the UK was already ahead of the IP curve. He points out that the industry’s main weakness is that they don’t own the entire communication path, don’t control the end-to-end-solution. I spoke with Mike Sherman over AES Intellinet about that very thing a while back.

We have gone down this route in the UK already. Seize the initiative and use a Webway, Chiron, Emizon or one of Steve’s devices to convert the existing panel to IP. Then do a deal with an ISP to resell network. Then you will manage the end to end solution and get recurring revenues, or at worst sit on the customers exisiting broadband line, which will be fine for an alarm but may be stretched if CCTV depending on the bandwidth required ie number of cameras on line at any one time. Remember CCTV is reliant on the upload speed not the download.

Steve replied, pointing out that there’s lots of opportunity there, if US security guys are willing to learn and embrace change.

Now there’s a good suggestion Simon. Rather than allow the IT guys to come in and pinch monitoring RMR, tech savvy Alarm Companies could expand on their knowledge of alarm and camera systems to go in and take part of the RMR for the Internet connection itself - and things that go with it like VoIP and IPTV.

Is anyone doing that in the UK ? - I’ve not heard of anyone doing it in the US.

Stay tuned.

by: Daniel Gelinas - Wednesday, August 18, 2010

nasunilogo

I wrote in this blog a while back about cloud storage–a developing thing in the security industry–and what it is and is not. I’ve also written about other types of storage. Storage is a big thing in security, especially when you start talking about video monitoring firms and the massive amounts of cached video data with which they’re dealing.

I also am putting the finishing touches on a story about DICE’s new DICEWise Wiki, powered by eTouch’s SamePage. DICE’s Cliff Dice is all about the cloud and the vast advantages it offers just about anyone with storage or information-delivery needs.

“Cloud based computing environments are deployable anywhere. It’s what most people are trying to move to … If you think about this, the world has really changed,” Cliff told me in a recent interview. “Google really changed the way the world looks at things, but Apple then took it to the next level. Those two companies have really changed the way we deploy software today, as we move away from Microsoft-type products that are PC-based and move more to a browser-based, movable solution.’”

dicewisewiki

I recently came across another interesting nugget on the Internets about cloud storage. Natick, Mass.-based cloud storage company Nasuni created an entertaining dramatization illustrating some of the benefits of the cloud over traditional storage methods and I thought it was actually very well done. I come from a theater/performance background and appreciate production value. You’ll recall, I also highlighted some of Monitronicsforays into dramatization for their Monix dealer training program.

Enjoy the video from Nasuni.

by: Daniel Gelinas - Monday, August 16, 2010

davismontage1I got an email from my friend Ty Davis over at Southwest Dispatch recently. Apparently he’s moving from Southwest Dispatch, where he is a VP of operations, to Life Alert in California. Ty, who has been with Southwest since 1996, will be making his move west in September.

Most recently for us here at SSN, Ty was one of the nominees who got selected by the editors of SSN for inclusion in this year’s prestigious 20 under 40 listing. Good luck to you Ty.

I spoke with Ty this morning via email and he talked a little about the impending move. Of the move to Cali. and to a different industry, Ty was hopeful and a little sad.

I have been with Southwest Dispatch for 14 years and absolutely love my job and the company. Life Alert approached me with a once in a life time opportunity that I could not pass up. The decision was made easier since they are not a third party central station and I knew that I would not be in direct competition with Southwest Dispatch. I respected my boss (Chip Bird) way too much to go to a competitor … It truly has been a bitter-sweet moment.

Ty said part of what intrigued him about the move was the opportunity to work in a completely different industry like PERS, where he could still use many of the strengths he’s gained over the last 14 years at Southwest. A large portion of the time I recently spent at Southwest when Gregg and I were down there was devoted to looking at all the technological odds and ends Ty et al. had lying around. PERS is an industry Ty feels has its future in technology.

PERS is a different animal all together so the challenge definitely intrigues me. Now that the baby boomers have started to get into the mid-sixty age range, they are going to be looking for technology to assist them with their day to day activities. I think they will look at companies like Life Alert to help with that assistance.

Ty said he and his family are anxious and excited for the move.

My family is all on board since they love the beach and we are big into the outdoor sports life. My 11 year old is a nationally ranked track and field athlete and is heavily into tennis (although she was excited to have the opportunity to surf). The weather in California will give her the opportunity to train year round.

Again, good luck Ty.

I met Ty first in 2008 at the CSAA’s Fall Operations Management Seminar in Peabody, Mass. We ate lunch together with Pam Petrow, among others, and talked about best practices and how lunch differed from previous years… Interesting topic, there. ;-)

I met Ty again just this year when SSN/SDN associate publisher Gregg Shapiro and I spent a week down in Dallas, visiting security firms (one of them, Monitronics, is possibly up for sale right now, in case you missed it) and depleting Lake Texoma of its crappie population.

I also wrote a story on an initiative Ty and his Southwest brethren recently undertook to streamline operations and go green. (I’m currently working on a story about DICE moving in much the same direction… tune in for that story later this week.)

by: Daniel Gelinas - Friday, August 13, 2010

CSAA\'s VP of marketing and programs Celia Besore will be missed as she moves on to the National Association of Hispanic Nurses (NAHN).

CSAA's VP of marketing and programs Celia Besore will be missed as she moves on to the National Association of Hispanic Nurses (NAHN).

I got a call from CSAA VP of marketing and programs Celia Besore this morning. She called to say goodbye.

I was like, “huh?” See, I didn’t get the latest issue of Signals (for some reason), dated Aug. 10, in which Celia’s future plans were revealed. Anyway, I assured Celia that had I known I’d've called her right away. Celia has been an invaluable source of information and help to me during the last two years. She’s pointed in the direction of leads, given me a heads up when things were going on… Heck, my first security industry blog post was about my first call to Celia on my first day. My predecessor, Leischen Stelter (now managing editor of SSN sister pub. Security Director News) told me to reach out to Celia soon and often, to rely on her. I did so and have always been thankful for the resource.

Besore said CSAA has not yet chosen a replacement. “I’m sure you’ll work closely with whoever takes my place,” she told me. “I’ve been working and getting everything I could finished up. I was not able to finish everything I wanted, but I did finish the directory [ACCENT], which was a monster. So at least that’s done. I also am putting the two new webinars online that we have coming up.”

In case you missed the announcement, here’s the skinny from the most recent issue of signals:

After 11 years of service to the Central Station Alarm Association (CSAA), Celia Trigo Besore is moving on to become the Executive Director & CEO of the National Association of Hispanic Nurses (NAHN), a 1,200-member professional society, with chapters throughout the U. S.

Celia bid the industry farewell, letting us all know she enjoyed her tenure.

“I am honored to have served CSAA. I will greatly miss the wonderful people I met here—from co-workers, to Board members, committees and wiki workgroup members and all the other wonderful members with whom I was fortunate to work,” Celia said.

Other security industry association heavy hitters chimed in to bid Besore farewell. Vector COO Pam Petrow worked closely with Besore on many projects and in many capacities, including CSAA’s Marketing & Communications Committee.

“I have had the pleasure of working closely with Celia over the past several years and found her enthusiasm and commitment evident in every project she undertook. She has been a tremendous asset in many areas and I will miss her tenacity, organization and passion for excellence.”

CSAA EVP Steve Doyle lauded Celia’s dedication to keeping CSAA focused on new technology and on educating CSAA members.

“Celia has helped enormously to bring CSAA into the electronic age and developed our communications efforts to an exceptional degree. We will all miss not just a colleague, but a ‘family’ friend.”

CSAA president Ed Bonifas praised Besore’s willingness to help.

“Working with Celia is always a pleasure. I cannot recall ever asking for something from her that she did not accomplish with perfection. The list of her accomplishments is longer than this space would allow. CSAA will surely miss her enthusiasm. Abe Lincoln said `Whatever you are, be a good one.’ Celia has always been better than ‘good.’ Best of luck, madam Executive Director! Celia, we will miss you.”

Celia’s last day is today, Friday, August 13, 2010.

Best of luck in your new position at NAHN, Celia! Thank you for all your work.

by: Daniel Gelinas - Wednesday, August 11, 2010

deterrenceI wrote a story recently on Sonitrol Security (AKA Kimberlite) and their impressive apprehension numbers for the month of July.

I got a comment on the story from Jose Chavarria (Iverify?). He asked the very good question what the true measure of success was: apprehending people or deterring crime in the first place. A very good question and insightful comment, and one I attempted to address in through the same medium (the comment box at the bottom of the story). Unfortunately for me, I tend to really bring the word count at times, and was told in no uncertain terms that my comment on Jose’s comment was too long. So I decided to take to the blog.

Jose writes:

“Is apprehension really the success or is deterrence the real measure?”

As I said, good question. Here’s the reply I’d prepared and was unable to upload through the comments section:

Hey Jose,

Thanks for the read and the comment. You bring up a valid point, and one that, I admit, I did not address overtly in the story. However, Tom, Marcos and I did discuss deterrence briefly in our interview. One of Tom’s points was that apprehensions lead to deterrence. From our talk:

“At the end of the day, the best way to deter crime is to arrest people, because word gets out,” Tom said. “2003, Modesto City schools had 49 campuses and we installed that and we apprehended 130 people the first year. They’d had another alarm company for 20 years prior to us that was not a verified alarm system company and they’d apprehended zero in 20 years. We apprehended 130 that first year and roughly a comparable number the second year and then it started falling off. And we find that whenever we go into a new school district, it takes a little while, but the word gets out and people stop trying. So apprehensions now at Modesto–we’re six years into that relationship–are down to half that number of apprehensions and I think that’s from the deterrence of having the Sonitrol system in there and the Sonitrol stickers in sight. So verification is the key to apprehension–and to deterrence.”

Again, Jose, thank you for continuing the discussion.

Where do you stand? Do you think verification makes the difference? Do you think the threat of apprehension (yard signs, stickers) is enough (As I addressed in an earlier blog post, many people DO argue that the system itself is unnecessary, or at least vaguely superfluous) or does it take more (like bustin’ some perp and hauling him away in a cruiser). Does Sonitrol’s Tom Patterson have a point? Does word get out… the record seems to say yes. However, a recent story from SSN shows that crime over all recently has been down… so who can say. I’m interested in your opinion.

by: Daniel Gelinas - Monday, August 9, 2010

niscayahlogogrey_rgb1

Just got a press release announcing yet another enlistee in the CSAA Five Diamond club. Congrats to Woburn, Mass.-based Niscayah. I’ve written plenty about the Five Diamond process and, as you know, have even undergone some of the training required of operators at Five Diamond centrals.

5diamondlogo

There are approximately 2,700 U.S.-based central stations that interact with the law enforcement, fire and emergency services agencies. Of this group, less than five percent have achieved Five Diamond status. In order to be certified Five Diamond all operators at the applying central have to pass the course, as well as demonstrate: proficiency in alarm verification, which helps reduce false alarms; proficiency in communications with the Public Service Answering Points, such as the Emergency 911 centers; knowledge of electronic communications equipment, including radio; an understanding of the codes and standards of such organizations as Underwriters Laboratories, Factory Mutual, the National Fire Protection Association and others; proficiency in the area of emergency preparedness under a wide scenario of possibilities. Central station managers interested in putting their central through its paces can learn more about it here and demo the operator Level 1 training course for free here.

CSAA director of marketing and communications Celia Besore has said Five Diamond companies have demonstrated an exceptionally high degree of responsibility to their local community and their customers through the investment of time, money and commitment to 100 percent quality operator training. “Whether a small company or a large one, these [Five Diamond] companies are committed to being engaged and active. We believe their engagement exposes them to the best ideas in the industry and makes them better each day,” Besore said.

From the Niscayah release:

Kevin Keohane, director of Retail Services states, ‘Acquiring 5 Diamond Certification demonstrates Niscayah’s ongoing commitment to quality service and continuous improvement. Through investments in technology and our most important resource, our people, Niscayah constantly strives to provide service excellence in taking responsibility for the trust and confidence of our client’s life and safety concerns.’

by: Daniel Gelinas - Thursday, August 5, 2010

mhealthlogoSo I’ve gotten a number of announcements about the upcoming mHealth Summit. It looks like an interesting event, and I’ve put out some feelers to some of the participants to find out what’s going on. Hopefully there’ll be more coverage, ongoing.

First, I got an announcement in early July about some of the sponsors for the event:

Washington, D.C. (July 06, 2010) - Industry leaders Abbott, Microsoft Research, Pfizer, Qualcomm, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Skype and Verizon Wireless have joined the 2010 mHealth Summit as sponsors, the conference organizers announced today.

I, of course, gravitated to the mention of telco sponsorship, and have reached out to Verizon for follow up. I bumped into a Verizon marketing person at ESX in Pittsburgh in June and exchanged pleasantries and cards, so hopefully, she’ll be able to get back to me soon with some input on Verizon’s future plans in security, PERS and mobile health.

This is the second annual mHealth Summit and this year’s event promises to keep the ball rolling from last year.

Building on the momentum from last year’s event, the second annual mHealth Summit will feature an expanded format that includes:

* keynotes delivered by leading corporate executives, philanthropists, policy-makers and social entrepreneurs;

* super sessions with key stakeholders from policy, research and technology communities;

* concurrent sessions addressing a range of relevant topics such as the intersection of mHealth and mFinance, and opportunities for mHealth in the current policy and regulatory environments, and;

* networking events to drive collaboration.

The event is expected to attract some 2,000 attendees, including international and domestic C-level executives, medical professionals, technologists, researchers, and policy makers, and over 150 exhibitors.

And then just a couple days ago I got the announcement that Mr. Microsoft himself would be keynoting the Summit.

Bill Gates Named Keynote Speaker at the 2010 mHealth Summit

High-level conference to explore role of research, technology & innovation in mobile health

Washington, D.C., August 3, 2010 - Bill Gates, Co-Chair and Trustee of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, will provide a keynote address on the opportunity of mobile technologies to improve health outcomes in the developing world at the 2010 mHealth Summit, the summit organizers announced today. The summit, organized by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health in partnership with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the mHealth Alliance, will be held November 8-10 in Washington, DC.

There are some heavy hitters involved here. If I were a traditional security guy, I’d maybe look at PERS, telehealth and mHealth and say, “There’s maybe some opportunity here for me to expand my business model, especially given the sponsorship dollars here.”

From the Gates keynotes release:

Mobile Health, or “mHealth,” is rapidly becoming a transformative solution for improving quality healthcare services in poor and remote regions around the world. With over 5 billion mobile subscriptions globally, cell phones are becoming a tool to help close the digital divide and increase access to a range of services, including healthcare.

The mHealth Summit will transpire from November 8-10, 2010 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C.

 

by: Daniel Gelinas - Tuesday, August 3, 2010

nsa

I was talking with Keith Jentoft over at RSI the other day about his efforts to get a priority response commitment for enhanced alarms from municipalities. In a real coup for Keith, the Chief of the Dallas Police has thrown his backing behind the idea, according to Keith.

Another victory for the Motion Viewer Man comes in the form of an official endorsement from the National Sheriffs’ Association for the Videofied product.

From a release on the NSA site:

NSA is proud to grant our endorsement of the following:

The NSA Board of Directors voted to endorse Videofied, a cordless outdoor video alarm system, during the Anaheim Conference.

Videofied is a cordless outdoor video alarm system – instant portable video security for remote sites including anhydrous tanks, utility substations, vacant property, fenced lots and parked vehicles. Wireless video alarm detects intruders and immediately sends a 10-second clip of the actual event over the cell network enabling immediate response for more arrests. The cordless system operates outdoors in harsh environments (-20 F to +140F) for up to four years on one set of batteries. Videofied security systems are being used by sheriffs to protect remote assets on a budget. A single system can include up to 24 portable MotionViewers (motion detector with an integrated night vision camera) for large scale protection. This affordable system, because it is totally wireless, can be deployed and redeployed as needed for instant action resolving problem crimes.

I’ve done plenty of reporting on Videofied and, as Keith pointed out to me, it seems like law enforcement is starting to take notice of proactive steps the industry can and does take to cut down on false alarms… Whether you confirm a real dispatch necessity through technology like video (Videofied, CheckVideo, or another type of advanced video monitoring like that provided by G4S, Viewpoint CRM, and Stealth Monitoring, to name a few) or audio (Sonitrol… I’m currently working a piece about some great stats from Kimberlite, dba “Sonitrol Security” throughout the San Joaquin Valley and Bay Area), or personally check out every alarm like the guys at Provident, it looks like law enforcement’s down with that.

Here’s another bit from the NSA endorsement release:

Excerpt from the due diligence report prepared by the endorsement committee:

“All Central Station Alarm Service providers, Alarm System Integrators, Customers, and Sheriffs Offices that were surveyed commented favorably regarding the overall level of service and support they receive from RSI Video Technologies Inc. or their sales representatives. All of the survey respondents rated the Videofied Alarm System as one of the more reliable Alarm Systems that they use. Survey respondents indicated that law enforcement officials favorably receive the Videofied Alarm System because alarm conditions are supported by video clips that allow Central Station operators to verify the intrusion before reporting the alarm condition to law enforcement authorities. They indicated that the video technology associated with the system allows Central Station operators to provide responding officers with information on the number of intruders, their descriptions, and other information, increasing the probability of apprehension and arrest. Many of the respondents provided case histories reflecting that property crimes were reduced or eliminated at customer locations that installed these systems.”

When alarms can be verified beforehand, shouldn’t they be? I’m just saying if the means are there and they work, what’s the argument for not doing it?

by: Daniel Gelinas - Wednesday, July 28, 2010

mace5dJust got a press release announcing the newest member of the CSAA Five Diamond club. Congrats to Mace CSSS. I’ve written plenty about the Five Diamond process and have even undergone some of the training required of operators at Five Diamond centrals. I’ve got my certificate and patch hanging on my wall!

There are approximately 2,700 U.S.-based central stations that interact with the law enforcement, fire and emergency services agencies. Of this group, less than five percent have achieved Five Diamond status. In order to be certified Five Diamond all operators at the applying central have to pass the course, as well as demonstrate: proficiency in alarm verification, which helps reduce false alarms; proficiency in communications with the Public Service Answering Points, such as the Emergency 911 centers; knowledge of electronic communications equipment, including radio; an understanding of the codes and standards of such organizations as Underwriters Laboratories, Factory Mutual, the National Fire Protection Association and others; proficiency in the area of emergency preparedness under a wide scenario of possibilities. Central station managers interested in undergoing the certification process can learn more about it here and demo the operator Level 1 training course for free here.

, , , ,

CSAA director of marketing and communications Celia Besore has said Five Diamond companies have demonstrated an exceptionally high degree of responsibility to their local community and their customers through the investment of time, money and commitment to 100 percent quality operator training. “Whether a small company or a large one, these [Five Diamond] companies are committed to being engaged and active. We believe their engagement exposes them to the best ideas in the industry and makes them better each day,” Besore said.

Mace CSSS VP & GM Morgan Hertel was proud of the progress the central has made in the last couple years. “We have invested heavily this last year in technology, people, and programs to make us the frontrunners in the wholesale monitoring industry,” Hertel said in a statement.

Located in Anaheim, Calif., Mace CSSS. is a national UL listed central station that monitors approximately 40,000 end user accounts on behalf of approximately 300 dealer clients. Mace CSSS, Inc. also provides high quality nationwide video monitoring services, including CCTV, IP and other configurations.

by: Daniel Gelinas - Monday, July 26, 2010

We all know false alarms are a nuisance to society: they cost taxpayers money, waste police resources, potentially dull response times and put officers’ lives in danger, and damage the relationships alarm companies have with municipalities and the public, among other scourges. I’ve written plenty of stories about false alarms and false alarm reduction efforts. But did you know they may also have helped to cause one of the largest ecological disasters in human history?

A July 23 story from The Los Angeles Times reports an investigation has uncovered the fact that alarms on the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig that monitored for fire and gas leaks were “inhibited” (meaning they would not sound at all–even if there was a real emergency) for as long as a year before the explosion occurred because those in command of the rig did not want their sleep interrupted by false alarms blaring out in the night.

Wow, really? I gotta be honest, if I were a worker (or another upper management type–Jeez, if I was on that rig at all, no matter who I was) on that rig (basically a humongous pile of hot, clanking, moving, metal parts sitting on top of and poking at an unbelievably large pressurized pocket of explosively flammable gas and oil) and I heard they’d shut off the alarms that were potentially saving me from getting blown up and/or burned alive, I’d probably be like, “ya know, why don’t you go ahead and just leave those on–better safe than sorry.” Eleven people were killed in the explosion on the Deepwater Horizon, and we’ve all seen the footage of BP’s growing oil slick.

I like this paragraph from the LA Times story:

“The alarm systems could have been helpful to alert crew members of catastrophe and initiate an emergency shutdown system that could have shut down the engines — a dangerous ignition source — as soon as a surge of flammable natural gas surged up the oil well onto the rig.”

Nothing like stating the obvious. The also say in the story that workers had continually accidentally tripped emergency shut down systems and alarms and that they had become something of a nuisance. People do the same thing with their home alarm systems–stop using them because they don’t want to keep setting them off by mistake. They don’t want to keep paying the false alarm fines. The problem is that the alarm is only good if it’s used. The solution is to learn how to use the equipment properly, not to shut off the equipment.

Here’s the thing. The disaster may have happened anyway, even if the alarms had been in place since it is believed a belch of natural gas that erupted up the oil line caught fire and caused an explosion. However, had the alarms been functioning properly, rather than intentionally disabled, lives may have been saved, property not blown up and ecosystems not destroyed. Doesn’t all that benefit outweigh the sleep quality of the guy in charge? They’re called earplugs, buddy, look into them.

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