Subscribe to

Blogs

Follow the Saflink technology

 - 
Monday, April 6, 2009
Just saw that Imprivata purchased IdentiPHI last week. They're traveling further down the road of converged identity by picking up more biometric capabilities, and the deal makes sense to me, but it's mostly of interest since Saflink was one of the first companies I took an interest in when I got into the security market, and now they're even one more step removed from reality. Saflink first split itself in half and spun off the Flo corporation, which deals in that registered traveler business. Then, Saflink "purchased" or "merged" with IdentiPHI in one of my favorite deals:
Saflink will acquire all of the outstanding shares of IdentiPHI in a stock-for-stock transaction where all of the outstanding shares of IdentiPHI will be exchanged for an aggregate total of 614,981,516 shares of Saflink common stock. After completion of the deal, former security holders of IdentiPHI would hold roughly 75 percent of the new company, which will be known as IdentiPHI, going forward, with headquarters in Austin, Texas. With Saflink stock trading at roughly 7.5 cents on Sept. 5, the deal is worth a theoretical $48 million. According to May 15 filings with the SEC, Saflink lost $3.5 million over the previous three months, with revenue of roughly $500,000.
614,981,516 shares. That's a lot of shares. And you've got to think three or four people held maybe 100,000,000 shares each. Imagine if you actually had 100,000,000 pieces of paper to represent those shares? Would that fill your entire house 10 times over? That Saflink/IdentiPHI leadership got something for former Saflink shareholders is probably a great executive maneuver. I'll try to find out exactly what he got.

And the winners are...

 - 
Monday, April 6, 2009
I know some of you care about the New Product Showcase winners from ISC West. I don't have a link (they don't seem to be online yet), but I've got a cut-and-paste for you. Pivot3's the big winner - though they unveiled the product at ASIS, so just how "new" is it exactly? Here you go: Pivot3 Wins Top Prize at New Product Showcase General Electric takes Judges’ Innovation Award LAS VEGAS, Nev. – Pivot3 on Wednesday was honored with the Best in Show Award at the 2009 New Product Showcase for its Serverless Computing storage solution. Serverless Computing, according to Pivot3, consolidates resources to reduce power, cooling, rack space and cost dramatically. General Electric’s Vigilant V-Series life safety system received the NPS Judges’ Innovation Award. The New Product Showcase (NPS), which is sponsored by the Security Industry Association (SIA), is held annually in conjunction with ISC West at the Sands Expo and Convention Center to recognize the best security product innovations. This year’s competition included 76 entrants. “The Security Industry Association is proud to promote the development of products that make our world safer,” SIA Chief Executive Officer Richard Chace said. “We congratulate each of the winners for their impressive technological achievements, and we thank all of the competitors for their important contributions to the industry.” The NPS category winners included: Monitoring: Broadband Discovery Systems for the Merlin LE Video Storage and Distribution: Pivot3 for Serverless Computing Access Control: EC Key for the EK 4 Enterprise Relay Integrated Software, Products and Systems: Vidsys for RiskShield Intrusion Detection: Designed Security for the Entry Sentry Tailgate Detection System Fire and Life Safety: (tie) FireLite Alarms by Honeywell for the IPDACT-2UD FireWatch Series IP Communicator; System Sensor for the CO1224T CO Detector with RealTest Ooooh, they'll have to arm wrestle in the Honeywell offices for who's the real top dog. OEM: Pentax for the 1.3 Megapixel Varifocal Plus Lens False Alarm Solutions: Nascom for the Universal Flip Switch IP Devices, Products and Software: Panasonic for the iPro WV-NP502 Megapixel Fixed Network Camera Video Devices: TimeSight Systems for Video Surveillance Appliances Video Analytics: Behavioral Recognition Systems for AISight Let me know if you consider any of that thrilling.

"The Haymaker for closing sales"

 - 
Saturday, April 4, 2009
I'm bored out of my skull in JFK, stuck in limbo trying to get home to Portland, Maine. So, of course, I'm surfing YouTube for security videos. That's how I spend my spare time, don't you know. And I've passed up all manner of videos of video cameras catching strange bright lights in the sky to bring you a guy talking in his kitchen. Why? This guy wants to help you sell residential accounts. He sells Smokin' Security. My favorite part is that he has a "Mr. X" that helps him with search engine optimization. I'm not sure I've ever heard a denser collection of empty marketing terms. Very impressive. Be a circle of influence, people.

Acuity: Major new player in IP video?

 - 
Friday, April 3, 2009
We'll have a more-robust story on this for the next newswire, but Acuity Systems seems like a new video company to watch closely. Just spoke with Glenn Waehner, the company's CEO, and here's the story. Basically, we worked at American Dynamics, which invented a ton of the technology that's still used today in video, back in the 1980s. Then, it was bought by Tyco, and Glenn moved over to Pelco, where he was senior VP of product development. All his old buddies at AD called him right up and said, "take us with you." So he did, opening up the Pelco New York office and basically housing all those guys there. Fast forward to last year when Schneider bought Pelco. Schneider wants to close New York, the guys in New York don't want to move, and so Glenn (who was most recently CTO at Pelco) and the rest of that legacy team started Acuity Systems, which is brand new and focused along the same innovation and service lines that they've always been focused. Does the world need another video company? Maybe they need this one - interesting to see what happens there.

The social media experiment at ISC

 - 
Friday, April 3, 2009
It's not like I didn't have the blog at last ISC West. Without it, I wouldn't have been able to bring you this guy: Sadly, Taser man has still never reached out to me - maybe he's on Twitter. That's definitely one way I'm suddenly contacting and being contacted. Though I think there's a universal bit of skepticism about the business value of Twitter and other social networking devices (Hi Chris), what we did last night, gathering maybe 30 people in the Treasure Island bar to talk shop (and not talk shop), was pretty cool. Basically, we only advertised the gathering via the blog and Twitter (and, I guess, telling people about it), and people actually showed up. At ASIS, we had a wine and cheese party at our booth that gathered the same amount of people, but we paid to print up little post cards and we paid to have it catered, and I'm thinking about the methods and the results. Catered events at shows=expensive. Printing things up=expensive (and wasteful). Twitter and the blog=free. Buying people drinks at the bar=less expensive (though we're in Vegas where beers are $7 unless you're at the tables, where they're free). So is that a business case argument for social networking. Did we see some ROI there, maybe? Kind of hard to say. I wonder if we'd have gotten the same amount of people if we'd just told people about it. I'm not entirely sure what all of the tabs came to. Maybe people like wine and cheese parties at the booth (where all of our branding happens to be, as well). Still, as an experiment, I think it was successful. And though all the conversations were "off the record," I still learned a bit and had some great arguments. Managed services may be the buzz here at ISC, but let's just say that there are still some skeptics. But I'm talking to Westec first thing this morning, so maybe I can do more to quiet that skepticism (or fuel it).

ISC West: Dice pushing Quantum, Alarm.com standalone video, and introducing Micro Key Solutions

 - 
Friday, April 3, 2009
I had a chance to sit down with Alarm.com director of product management, Bob McCarthy today. Alarm.com officially launched its standalone video offering at ISC West this year. It offers all the same features as the integrated security solution (full managed video services and home or business management functions like thermostat and lighting control). The integrated security offering was released in November. I also had the opportunity to speak with Gary Slavin and Kari Brua about Micro Key and their recent name change. Micro Key is now known as Micro Key Solutions. According to Slavin, the name change makes sense. “What we’ve done for years is help alarm companies find total solutions,” Slavin said. “We’re not just a software company.” Micro Key Solutions also has a new tag line, “Manage, Control, Succeed.” The changes, according to Micro Key Solutions president Wayne Torrens, are appropriate. “Our customers have assisted us in becoming more than just a software company. We have and will continue to offer complete solutions for alarm dealers and central stations of any size as well as systems integrators,” Torrens said during his speech at the Micro Key press conference. “We have, and will continue to offer best-in-class software and customer support for the entire security alarm industry.” I also met with Cliff Dice and Phil DuPont of Dice Corporation, and we talked about all things Quantum. Dice said that they have been getting very positive feedback for their Quantum Operator platform and expect more positive feedback when they release such Quantum branded offerings as Quantum Video. Phil was also nice enough to agree to transport a little something I put together for Melissa Roedel. Happy reading Melissa.

On to Day 2

 - 
Thursday, April 2, 2009
No running this morning, I was up later than planned last night listening to Sam and Bob argue about PSIM (see Sam's blog for details). Momentarily, I'm off to a Smith & Wesson breakfast, where they'll be talking about their new dealer program. And here's the plan for the rest of the day: Going to the Honeywell Fire Systems and System Sensor press conference; catching up with AMAG; interviewing Potter Electric president Bernie Lears; talking with J.D. Keller who's in charge of the dealer program at ADT; seeing Honeywell vet and industry entrepreneur Lance Dean; visiting Xtralis; Black & Decker; and wrapping up the day with an interview with Scott Hearn, Cooper Notification's new prez. From 12-1 in room 1002, I'll be participating in a Meet the Press event with other industry reporters, notably Rhianna Daniels, editor of our sister newspaper, Security Director News. Stop by and say hi. Oh, and check out the interviews Sam & I did yesterday from the show floor for ssnTVnews. They'll be posted on our home page at some point this morning. One more thing, some mass notification news: This press release was in my inbox this morning. I'm going by the Honeywell booth again tomorrow (was there yesterday, see newswire story)
HONEYWELL AND REACT SYSTEMS PROVIDE UNIFIED SOLUTIONS FOR INTEGRATED SECURITY AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE Mass Notification Allows Organizations to React to Security Events More Quickly and Accurately LOUISVILLE, Ky., April 2, 2009 – Honeywell (NYSE: HON) has teamed with Roseville, California-based REACT Systems™, Inc. to provide a unified security solution for mass notification. The offering allows the REACT! Enterprise Critical Response Notification System to interface with Honeywell’s Pro-Watch® security management and WIN-PAK® access control platforms. Bringing Honeywell and REACT security technologies together provides users with the ability to automate the process of initiating a response to critical scenarios, ensuring that information reaches people quickly so they can take appropriate action. “During an emergency situation, every second counts,” said John Lorenty, general manager for access systems, Honeywell. “Many businesses today still rely on outdated procedures and methods to communicate in a crisis. By providing a way to allow security personnel to reach the greatest number of people in the shortest amount of time, we’re fulfilling our mission of helping make the world safer and more secure.” The interfacing of Honeywell’s Pro-Watch and WIN-PAK platforms with REACT allows notification of security events to occur quickly and efficiently, wherever responders are, using whatever communication methods are available. While organizations often have plans in place for first responders, the response plans often stop there. Because many security and life safety events can impact a larger set of people, it is critical that organizations have the ability to provide specific instructions to staff and visitors. “We are happy to be working with Honeywell to improve the security and response effectiveness of organizations,” said Maria Ligeti, chairman and CEO of REACT Systems. “Through providing mass notification technology for effective response to events, we can provide our customers with the ability to save lives and reduce the impact of security and life safety events.” The interface to Pro-Watch and WIN-PAK, as well as a standalone offering, is currently available through Honeywell’s Integrated Security channel. Honeywell and REACT are demonstrating the new offering at ISC West, April 1-3 in Las Vegas, NV in booth 14023. For more information, visit www.honeywell.com/security .

The covert surveillance market

 - 
Thursday, April 2, 2009
Was talking with Supercircuits today and they made a big pitch for being tops in the covert surveillance market, and I've got to admit I really don't think much (or hear much, for that matter) about the covert market. The messages I normally get almost always involve deterrence - "We put the cameras in obvious places for a reason"; heck some people actually install fake cameras - but George Farley made a pretty good case for this being an underserved market by the integrators. Everybody's talking about ROI. Well, if you can reduce internal shrink (which is a lot of where shrink comes from) with hidden cameras, there's a good ROI. The law enforcement market's obviously a big one - but I don't hear it talked about often. And lots of places like museums and arts institutions don't necessarily want to broadcast that they're recording people. So, why don't people talk about covert surveillance? Is it because it's kind of icky: "Hey, I can help you spy on your employees." Does it really take the Big Brother thing too far? In most cases, on private property, there really aren't too many legal implications. Just when I think I've heard all the pitches before, somebody makes me think. I like it when that happens.

Bad economy=best thing for ISC West

 - 
Thursday, April 2, 2009
It sounds horrible, but I'm a little bummed about the news the economy might be picking back up. This is by far the most productive ISC West I've ever had and it's because the difficult economic times have forced manufacturers to focus their businesses on helping integrators make sales and run their businesses and the conversations I'm having are the most pointed and interesting I've had. Further, while the traffic might be down here, the universal sentiment is: good riddance to the people that were only coming here to party and pick up trinkets at the booths (or to ogle the scantily clad women employed as dealer attractors in some booths). Everyone's telling me that they're having the same productive conversations with the attendees as they're having with me. The people here are serious about doing business, are committed to the industry and security, and they're aggressive in tough times. Elan Moriah, president at Verint, told me: "The people that came here are people who are looking to make buying decisions, not so much of the visitors who come just for the gifts, which we’ve seen the last couple of years. It's definitely different this year." Everybody's talking about ROI, total cost of ownership, value propositions, making the business case for security, and at the same time talking about providing more training for the dealers, more marketing and sales tools. I can't tell you how many times I've heard that it's not about the newest technology, it's about supporting the technology that exists, innovating to meet needs that actually exist, being smarter about selling into specific verticals and understanding the real-world security problems that exist in each individual business and operation. Two years ago, it was about which party you were going to and all the cool things the widget could do. Hopefully this kind of business focus can be replicated even in the good times.

The Assa Abloy breakfast is SRO

 - 
Thursday, April 2, 2009
I'm not going to do a full live blog on this because I came in a little late (no comments, please), but a bunch of integrators sure woke up on time to hit the Assa Abloy systems integrator breakfast. Right now they're talking about electronic access control OEM sales. Basically, EAC software drives 750,000 openings in the USA a year and the OEMs are investing a bunch of cash in improving functionality. This is the preferred go to market model for Assa. They're pushing the Sargent WiFi locks this way, and pretty soon come the PoE locks. Partners include AMAG, S2, PCSC, Sielox, DMP, Reach, GE Security, and a couple others I can't read. The new toy? The battery operated WiFi lock that communicates back over 802.11b infrastructure. We wrote about this at ASIS, I think. I'd link back but I'm getting really crappy wireless card reception here in the Titian ballroom. A couple guys from Red Hawk have just come up to talk about how they're making a bunch of sales with the WiFi solution, especially in K-12 applications. "We were able to leverage their existing infrastructure; allows the school district to install literally thousands of these without wiring. The ability to use third-party software, allow the SDKs to be written by other manufacturers, allows them a lot more flexibility. When you're talking about a WiFi lock such as this, you're not up running in the ceiling, you're eliminating that. It's easier to quote, because you don't have to estimate wire runs. It's easier for them to budget, just locks time price, so they can figure out how many locks to buy each quarter or what you."

Pages