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Sad news for the industry

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Tuesday, July 22, 2008
Some very sad news came across the wire today: Industry Veteran Mike McGrath Loses Battle with Cancer Security industry veteran Mike McGrath passed away on July 5 at the age of 66, following a long battle with cancer. When Mike arrived in the United States 16 years ago, he brought with him two decades of experience in the security industry in England. As the marketing director for Central One Monitoring, he quickly became a familiar face in the industry, and was often quoted in industry publications on topics including trends in new technologies and the business of central station monitoring. Following Central One's acquisition by COPS Monitoring in June 2006, Mike was asked to remain with the company in order to provide the expertise and experience necessary to expand COPS' market in Florida. "Mike was not only a knowledgeable leader in the alarm industry, but a colleague and a friend as well. His presence will be missed," said Jim McMullen, president of COPS Monitoring. "Our thoughts and prayers are with Mike's family in this difficult time." Mike is survived by his wife of 40 years, Diane McGrath, a son, Perry McGrath, and four granddaughters who live in Ireland. Memorial contributions may be made in Mike's name to: Hospice by the Sea, 1531 West Palmetto Park Road, Boca Raton, Florida 33486. When I was first hired here to edit Security Systems News, our publisher, then Tom Curry who was also new, decided we needed to meet the industry as quickly as possible, so he set up this crazy trip with the help of our salespeople here, that took us from DSC in Toronto to Central One (which had just been bought by Devcon, at the time) to HID in Irvine to Pelco in San Jose, all in the span of three days. It was a brutal trip, though very instructive. Partly because of Mike McGrath, who met with us at Central One. He was a soccer fan, had a thick and fun Irish accent, and was very laissez faire about his predicament, having just been acquired. I think he said he'd been part of 15 acquisitions in his lifetime, and he hadn't been laid off yet. Something about that seems like a ringing endorsement. I didn't know Mike well, but I knew him enough to know that a lot of people must have loved him very much and I'm sorry to hear about his passing. You can find quotes from him here that give you an idea of his outlook on things: COPS buys Central One from Devcon

Who's the alarm company? Naturally.

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Friday, July 18, 2008
Is this Tennessee alarm company engaging in deceptive sales tactics? Can you tell who the alarm company is? "The Alarm Company"--that's their name--of Cordova, Tenn., says they're not trying to make anyone think that they're ADT when they sell their wares door-to-door, according to this story A sales rep from The Alarm Company said he knocks on doors that have ADT signs out front, and uses this sales pitch: "We're with The Alarm Company. We saw your ADT sign and decided to stop by to offer you an upgrade to your coverage that will protect your windows." The sales rep says people have been confused before, but he's not trying to confuse them. You see, he doesn't tell customers that he's from ADT; he tells people he's from The Alarm Company. Does this guy's sales pitch remind anyone else of Abbott & Costello's "Who's on first?" routine? Here's a reminder of how that went: This is not the first time there have been complaints about The Alarm Company. The Mid South Better Business Bureau lists the company as unsatisfactory. I blogged about this company, which is owned by Tom Brady, on May 2 when a local TV station pulled a Mike Wallace on them. ADT says it's looking into the complaints. Meanwhile, the Abbott and Costello sales guy told The Tuskegee News: "The hardest thing about my job right now is gaining somebody's trust."

This is progress

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Friday, July 18, 2008
Our 20 under 40 issue comes out in August, and it's going to be a hum-dinger (actually, it is a hum-dinger already, you just can't see it until it's printed). Working on it, there's been a lot of talk about how we bring not only young people into the industry, but also people from other walks of life (you know, not 55-year-old paunchy white guys).
Then I got the ESX photos in my email box. I'm sorry, but something about this picture says that the security industry is moving in the right direction. From left to right, that's Dean Seavers, CEO of GE Security; Cris Carter, Chairman of Carter Bros. (and he's done some other stuff, too); Bud Wulforst, president of the CSAA, and George Gunning, outgoing president of the NBFAA. Cool shot. Now, if we could just get a woman into that picture...

Maybe the best press release ever

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Thursday, July 17, 2008
This came into my email box today. I'm pretty happy about it. Dear Boss, Please check our new product information and waiting for your reply. Thank you, keep in touch and have a nice day. Our products also have some advanced features: Simultaneous MPEG-4 and Motion JPEG Two-way Audio with Built-in Microphone Mobile Phone Streaming Live Video through 3GPP/ISMA RTSP Built-in Multi-window Motion Detection James Sung Okay, there are a bunch of product descriptions, too, that I cut out. Boring. I mean, "No way! Your camera has superior low-light performance?!? Wow. And a 1/3" Sony CCD?!? It's like I've been searching for you all my life, but no camera maker could ever fulfill my every dream the way you can. Let's get married." Products don't matter. It's the form of address that counts. If you start out your email with "Dear Boss," it's just about a guarantee I'll read through it. Other greetings you might try: "Hey Champ"; "How's it hanging, Big Guy"; and, maybe if you're of the opposite sex, "Dear Sweet-Cheeks." Those are almost certain to get my attention. On a serious note, how on God's green earth are integrators and end users supposed to make heads or tails of all these camera manufacturers? And how do all these camera manufacturers all turn a profit? The mark-up on those things must be amazing.

PC drops suit

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Wednesday, July 16, 2008
I like art, I like movies, I find influential people interesting, why do I not like the Hollywood "Power Couple" that was suing ADT? My question is rhetorical. (Unless of course you, too, don't like PC, then send me a comment.) Don't know the PC? They're former Paramount Pictures honcho Sherry Lansing, and her husband Exorcist director William Friedkin. They sued ADT earlier this year saying ADT didn't respond to an alarm at their house in a timely manner and they had a bunch of "irreplaceable jewelry" stolen. (I'm getting weepy writing about it again.) In March, I blogged about how ADT got permission to go in and take photos of the house for three hours. Well, this week, PC petitioned to drop its lawsuit. Both PC and ADT are mum about details. Here's the story

On the Fence

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Wednesday, July 16, 2008
Here's a profile article by CE Pro Magazine about Wayne Alarm Systems in Lynn, Mass. The owner, who if you're at all keyed into the monitoring industry, will know as Ralph Sevinor posing in his well-known alarm museum. Even a relative newbie to the industry like me knows Ralph (but I always want to call him "Wayne"- Does anyone else have that problem?). The premise of the article is exactly the topic we here at SSN continually tout: How can security companies increase their RMR by entering the home automation space? I think this paragraph makes a good point about some of the insecurities felt within the industry: A company like Wayne Alarm Systems can't snap its fingers and start offering control, according to Sevinor. "It's a philosophical change," he says. "When somebody looks at a home automation system or a TV, they're looking at a life expectancy of two or three years. When somebody is looking at a security system, they're looking at 20 years." According to the article, Sevinor has tasked an employee (the other guy in the photo) to investigate the profitability of entering the "control" space, as CE Pro refers to it. This is probably a decent and smart business strategy and I hope the next article about Wayne Alarms (perhaps done by yours truly) will be about its entrance into the space. It would be a good, reassuring example for the rest of the industry, many of who are also on the fence about all this ding dang new technology, and proof that, yes, it can be done. Show us the way Ralph, I mean Wayne, I mean Ralph.

InGrid knows whom to pay off

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Wednesday, July 16, 2008
When it comes to media manipulation, the InGrid has few peers in the security industry. Not only have they launched a great set of ads, employing Jerry Zucker, but now they've managed to weasel their way into the annual "Summer Home Security Tips" piece that every crappy newspaper in the country eventually runs. Here's a version of it from the Elk Grove Citizen. The story is provided by ARA Content, which "provides free, high quality feature articles to reporters, editors and print publishers. These features are copyright free and in a variety of categories coordinated to fit the editorial calendars of a typical newspaper. Whether you have a seasonal need or a regular space to fill, our content is available online and updated regularly. All articles are written or edited by professional journalists and the majority include high-resolution photos." When most small-town editors see these pieces come across, they think: "Sweet. Free content. Time to go fishing." Of course, they're paid for by companies like InGrid. Take a look at the actual content the American people are getting from their friendly neighborhood local paper: * Make your home look lived in Ask a friendly neighbor to make sure the lawn is mowed and keep an eye out for unusual activity around your house. Suspend newspaper and mail delivery or have someone collect them for you and make sure the trash cans are put out and brought in on time. The more lived-in your home appears to be, the less inviting it is to thieves. Okay, der, obviously. * Leave a light on Put a few lights and a radio on timers set to go on and off at random times during the day and evening. Leaving one light on the entire time you're away is an obvious sign that no one is around to turn it off. Close most of your window shades, but keep a few open on upper floors for light to shine through and make it look like someone is home. Install motion detector lights by each entry to your home, including the garage. Thieves don't want to be in the spotlight! Yep, that's pretty similar to your first point there. * Don't invite a climber Don't leave toys or ladders around your yard, they can easily be used to stand on or climb up to break into your home. Likewise, prune back any tall trees with branches near upper windows. Hmm. Haven't heard that one before. If the thief is going to break into a window anyway, why would he/she climb up a ladder to do it on the second floor? * Lock it up It sounds obvious, but lock the doors and windows - more than 50 percent of thieves burglarize homes by walking right in. Use deadbolt locks that can only be opened with a key and forget about hiding the key under a doormat. If you must keep a key nearby, purchase a steel lockbox with a combination that is specifically made to store keys. Yep. Lock your house. Good tip. * Sound the alarm A survey by Temple University found that alarm systems, when used with other precautions, reduce the likelihood of burglary by more than 60 percent. InGrid Home Security is one of the first home security solutions that works wirelessly through a home's broadband connection and is built with multiple system backups for added safety - that means there is no single point of vulnerability such as phone lines that can be cut. Wireless home security systems also allow for monitoring, arming and disarming from anywhere, via a Web site to let you double check on your home while away. InGrid offers around-the-clock professional monitoring and the money-saving option for homeowners to install the system themselves, allowing them to set up sensors wherever they would like, for both emergency and non-emergency alerts. Whoa. Seems to me lots of companies offer wireless backup. But Johnny and Sally Consumer might think, 'Gee, that's a new idea. I'm going to buy an InGrid system! Sign us up!' This is not responsible newspapering. This is, however, insidious marketing. Good for InGrid. Ethically bad for the crap newspapers who print this garbage. They are not serving their readers unless the piece is clearly marked as advertising. * Don't squirrel valuables away Thieves aren't dumb, they know people like to stash their goods under the bed, between the pages of books and in the sock drawer. Store your valuables in a safe-deposit box at the bank or in a safe you can bolt to the floor. Taking a few simple precautions before taking off for vacation can provide the peace of mind you need to relax during your time off and come back to home sweet, secure home. Thanks Elk Grove Citizen. I totally feel safe now!

Wren and Tippy

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Monday, July 14, 2008
It's pretty hard for me to read this very nice piece about Wren Solutions without giggling a little. First off, Wren is run by a guy named "Tippy"? Like Wren and Tippy? Like Ren and Stimpy? How did I not know that? I've only met Andrew Wren, whom I'm guessing is Tippy's son. This is Tippy: This is Ren and Stimpy: Hmmm. I'm going to say there's a bit of a resemblance there. (Sorry, Tippy.) Is there a security-related inspiration for one of the most twisted cartoons ever produced? I think more investigation may be needed. And you've got to love the caption they provide for Tippy: Cliff “Tippy” Wren is the founder of Wren Solutions, located in St. Martins. He started working for his father in his pre-teen years and is celebrating 25 years at Wren Solutions. Am I the only one that thinks that sounds like Tippy is only 40 or so? Is so, he hasn't aged all that well...

McGraw leave GE for ADT

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Friday, July 11, 2008
Tony McGraw is ADT's new regional vice president for the western United States. He'll be based in Aurora, Colo. and be responsible for ADT operations in 23 states. He reports to ADT president John Koch. Here's the press release. McGraw was with GE for 24 years before coming to ADT. Most recently, he was GE Security's general manager of global service operations in the Homeland Protection Division. Before that, he held various management positions within GE Healthcare.

It's meta-surveillance video

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Friday, July 11, 2008
You post-structuralists out there will appreciate this story: Jacksonville police have video of someone stealing surveillance video. I know. Wha? The story is about as badly organized and constructed as possible, but the first paragraph gets the gist of it: One day after three men robbed a young mother at gunpoint, inside her home - someone stole the surveillance video from detectives. That theft was caught on camera. I mean, that's a really crappy couple of sentences (is there a reason for the hyphen?), but the point is that one crime (the robbery of the young mother) was caught on home surveillance footage. And then that footage, which was in the possession of the police, was stolen. And they got that crime on video, too. And, seriously, I've got to go through the whole rest of this article because it's just too crazy in so many ways: Doctor Royce McGowan refuses to watch Wednesday's surveillance video of the invasion into his Arlington home. His wife, mother-in-law and baby were inside the home when the men kicked in the front door. "I just listened to it once. I can't listen to it again. It enrages me," said McGowan. Yes, really, that's the next paragraph in the story. Yes, you can figure out why we're talking about McGowan (I like how they spell out "Doctor" - that's totally AP style), but it's not actually clear from the preceding paragraph which seems to talk about a young mother. And in the first paragraph, why was only the young mother relevant? Usually, if there's a baby involved, that baby's in the lede (that's a journalism term there - you're supposed to spell it wrong). And why are we talking about "listening" to surveillance footage? Shouldn't we be watching it? Did McGowan refuse to watch the video and only listen, and only do that once before turning over the footage to the coppers? I'm confused. He gave the video to the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office. He hopes the clear pictures of the men will help detectives find them. Why are we in the present tense for the second paragraph here, especially considering this next sentence? However his home surveillance video was stolen from police. The theft was caught on his office surveillance camera Thursday. "Crime is everywhere - you can't escape it," said McGowan. This doesn't really seem like a potential problem. How could the video be stolen? There was only one copy of the footage and that was given to the police? What was it a VHS tape or something that they didn't make a copy of? This doesn't seem remotely possible. And I'd like the "his office" to be a little clearer. Why are the cops interviewing the couple at McGowan's office if the incident happened in their home? I'm still confused. While a JSO detective was interviewing the couple inside the office, the surveillance cameras caught a man pulling up next to the detectives car in the parking lot. It would kill people to use apostrophes correctly. How do we show possession? Maybe by writing "detective's"? After scoping out the car for more than 10 minutes, the man broke out the car's back window and stole the laptop. Inside that laptop was a DVD of the surveillance video from Wednesday's home invasion. "Without that... we wouldn't have any recollection on who did it," said McGowan. Okay, I love that a guy was able to smash the window of a cop car, steal a laptop, and get away without anyone doing anything about it. That's awesome. But, seriously, why is a reporter acting like it's news that a DVD of surveillance video was stolen? Is it possible that's the only copy of the footage, like there's a security camera out there that just spits out DVDs and if you lose that DVD, well, you're SOL (that's also a very important journalistic term, but I'm not going to spell it out for you)? Isn't it more newsworthy that a cop's laptop was stolen? That seems like a bigger deal to me. McGowan had just moved into the Brentwood Avenue office two months ago. The cameras have been in place for fewer than three weeks. This doesn't seem relevant to me, but those are, indeed, two declarative sentences. His security company, Homeland Security Group, was able to replace the DVD. The laptop and the thief are still missing. Huh. So that first paragraph, where it was newsworthy that the surveillance video was stolen, was kind of disingenuous, wasn't it? Because you, the reporter, already know that footage was easily replaceable and therefore this isn't news. And what about the surveillance footage of the laptop theft? Did we get a license plate number? Is the face visible? No idea. At least they named the security company. That's a rarity. JSO says there is no sensitive information on the laptop. This might be my favorite part. A cop's laptop has "no sensitive information" on it? How are we defining "sensitive" here? What does he use the laptop for? Playing Minesweeper when he's bored by the side of the highway? So, a cop's laptop is stolen from the back of his car and we're worried about the DVD inside of it? Super. McGowan plans to add cameras to their home and business. Why? You caught both recent crimes on video. Is this just a last sentence because it seemed like there had to be a last sentence somewhere? Well done, award-winning news anchor Victor Blackwell (or, more likely, Victor's intern). Well done.

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