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Specifically Speaking with Jeff Spivey

President of Security Risk Management in Charlotte, N.C.
 - 
11/30/2015

During our conversation you mentioned the “new security model.” Can you explain what you mean by that?

10 ways security integrators can make money from cloud

 - 
Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Can you make money from cloud-based video and access control? Are cloud-based systems more vulnerable to cybersecurity attacks? Is it too early to embrace cloud-based technology?

These are just three of the many questions that we'll be answering at Cloud+, a new conference that I've been putting together over the past several months. The conference is around the corner: Dec. 7-8 in Silicon Valley, but it's not too late to sign up!

Over that past two weeks, I've had conference calls with a very cool lineup of speakers who will be looking at cloud-based technology in a way that our industry has not previously done. We'll give you many more than 10 ways to make money from cloud. 

--The educational sessions will cover everything from basic definitions to the implications of central station infrastructure sitting in the cloud and the possibilities of cloud-powered biometrics.

--Our keynote speaker from Microsoft will talk about which industries are doing a good job taking advantage of cloud and how they're doing it.

--Leading integrators will give you expert advice and real-life examples of how to make profit and provide ROI from cloud-based access control and video.

--We’re excited to have Rodney Thayer, who’s adept at both security consulting and hacking, doing a presentation about cybersecurity and how to ensure safety in the cloud.

--The exhibit hall will be educational too. It's the first venue ever to showcase cloud-based physical security technology side-by-side in one place.

Hope to see you in California Dec. 7-8! Here's a link to the program and registration.

The IoP(ets)

 - 
Monday, November 23, 2015

I am one of the 60 percent of reported Americans who own pets. Apparently, this will drive me to be a smart home customer.

I have two cats. One is older, one is a kitten. I love them to death. Do I need to watch them 24/7? No. They wake up after hours of sleep about 4 a.m., jump on my sleeping head and clamor for breakfast. After they eat, they are rambunctious, then they go back to sleep. For hours. How do I know where they are without a camera? I see their inches-deep hair on my living room sofa.

They greet me at the door when I arrive home about 6 p.m., run around for a few minutes and then go back to sleep. This is no insightful news to cat owners.

But according to Vivint, we should be using smart home technology to take better care of our pets’ “safety, health and overall care.” We can monitor their activity level and food intake. 

The “passion people have for their pets … means a large market opportunity for those companies connecting pets and smart home technology,” the study says.

I get the IoT thing to find lost pets. What I don’t understand is people wanting to check in on their indoor pets, including monitoring their eating habits. One of my cats, the older one, is very fat. “Pet management,” including “smart pet food monitoring,” could become a driving force in the IoT market, the study said. I just prefer to give my fat cat less food.

I’m skeptical, but also interested in who uses this technology. I’ve heard it’s mostly Millennials, but Vivint says the use of smart home tech for pet care “is likely to be one of the strongest demand drivers for the smart home in coming years.”

Pet owners’ passion “could be a significant entry point for many into the smart home,” it said. I have passion for my pets, but they are, afterall, pets. I don’t feel the need to watch them all the time and see where they’re sleeping. I will spare you my opportunity to post photos of them here (but they are both cute, trust me); they don’t need me watching them around the clock. 

Who has another view?  Am I just a bad pet owner?

How I Use My System: Robert Forsythe

 - 
11/23/2015

Robert Forsythe is the president of US Monitoring, a wholesale monitoring company based in Oklahoma City. He is also the president of C & C Products a rep firm for security products, also based in Oklahoma City. He started in the industry in 1989 as a service manager with Rollins Security.

Specifically Speaking with Walter 'Skip' Adams

 - 
11/23/2015

What kinds of customers/projects do you work with?

Specifically Speaking with Sean A. Ahrens

 - 
11/23/2015

What kinds of security project do you focus on at Aon?

Drones have a place in security

SSN poll: 71 percent think drones are good for business
 - 
11/20/2015

YARMOUTH, Maine—Drones have applications in physical security, according to 76 percent of respondents to Security Systems News’ latest poll. In fact, about half of poll respondents said they are working with drones already.

Security pros can get BS through SIA/college program

 - 
Wednesday, November 18, 2015

The University of Phoenix College of Security and Criminal Justice and SIA have partnered to provide those who have completed a SIA Certified Security Project Manager credential with 21 credit hours to apply toward a bachelor of science in security management.

The goal, according to a prepared statement, is to respond to industry demands by providing flexibility to security professionals to advance and increase skills in the ever-changing industry.

“University of Phoenix is proud to partner with the Security Industry Association to provide security professionals with flexible learning options and industry-aligned curriculum that will further their education and build upon the skills gained through a CSPM certificate,” Spider Marks, executive dean for University of Phoenix College of Security and Criminal Justice, said in the statement.

Security professionals holding CSPM certificates have a minimum of approximately three years of hands-on project management experience. However, a survey by the Project Management Institute found that the majority of CSPM certificate holders in the United States do not have college degrees. 

“The increasing complexity in the security industry has resulted in expanding demands for educated professionals,” said Don Erickson, SIA chief executive. “This agreement offers seasoned practitioners who already possess management experience to apply their practical skills toward a degree that supports their career advancement while also meeting industry needs.”

The agreement between University of Phoenix College of Security and Criminal Justice and SIA is just one example of a growing list of strategic initiatives the college is undertaking as it increases its focus on meeting educational needs within the security sector, it said. 

Five Questions: Cassie Weaver

 - 
11/18/2015

Cassie Weaver was appointed the operation coordinator for Dakota Security, a PSA Security owner based here, in May. She assists with sales and engineering and other duties around the office. Dakota Security has more than 100 employees. Its operations are concentrated in the upper Midwest with offices in Des Moines, Iowa; Omaha, Neb.; Fargo, N.D.; and Chicago. It also has an East Coast office in New York, and a West Coast office in Phoenix. Originally from Iowa, Weaver’s family moved to South Dakota when she graduated from high school. She eventually moved away but then returned to the area. Security Systems News talked with her in November and asked her five questions.

Video verification and I-View Now, providing more information

 - 
Wednesday, November 11, 2015

SIA and Security Systems News hosted a webinar last week, focusing on I-View Now and what video verification can do for alarm businesses. Presenters underlined the value and importance behind verification, such as the ability to provide police with more information before dispatch.

The panel, moderated by SSN’s VP and group publisher Tim Purpura, featured Larry Folsom, president of I-View Now, Michael Keen, VP of commercial sales for Protection 1, and Alice DeBiasio, general manager, cloud services at Honeywell Security and Fire.

I-View Now integrates disparate surveillance video into one unified interface for video verification, making the process easier on central station operators.

I-View Now is also integrated with home automation devices such as Honeywell’s Total Connect. Folsom said that consistency is important; as in having the same views for both the central station operator and for the end user checking in on their system.

Some devices, like cameras, are now sold I-View Now Ready, meaning that it can connect with the platform automatically, reducing the amount of install time.

Purpura asked the webinar audience, “What percentage of your current account base requires some sort of verification before dispatching police services?” Just under half said that verification is needed on less than 20 percent of their accounts. Twenty-eight percent need verification for 20 to 40 percent. Fourteen said between 40 and sixty percent of their accounts, and 9 percent said more than 60 percent of their accounts.

Some of these results could be due to non-response cities—areas that require verification before dispatching police. Although, Folsom said, “Additional information is just helpful regardless of the city’s response policy.”

Verification was more finely defined recently, Folsom pointed out, referencing the Texas Police Chiefs’ definition, established earlier this year

The panel also addressed the DIY market. Folsom pointed to the difficulty for 911 centers, that calls from cell phones often reach the wrong 911 center.

Folsom said DIY/MIY Market isn’t a threat, but instead an opportunity. Keen said that Protection 1 adopted DIY solutions as a way to reach customers outside the company’s network, and reach the “tech-savvy” customers that enjoys installing the system themselves. DeBiasio pointed to a potential to eventually upsell DIY customers to professional systems.

The full webcast is available on demand here.

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