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PBFAA celebrates its 30th at annual expo

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Friday, May 18, 2012

Happy 30th anniversary, Pennsylvania Burglar & Fire Alarm Association!

The association is one of the oldest such organizations in the industry, according to its executive director Dale Eller. So it’s got a lot to celebrate and is using its annual expo in June to do that. Here’s more from a news release the group sent out today:
 

The PBFAA will host their 30th Annual Membership Meeting, Golf Outing and Exposition on June 6-7, 2012 at the Lancaster Host Resort in Lancaster, Penn.

The event will commemorate the 30 years of association activity through several member activities.

Kicking off the event on June 6th is the PBFAA's annual golf outing which will host over 75 golfers in a shotgun scramble format.  The outing consists of several hole-in-one contests, including a par 3 with a $10,000 prize hole.  Other contests include longest drive and closest to the pin on the front and back nine holes.  The golf outing concludes with an awards luncheon for all of the outing participants.

The evening event incorporates the annual membership meeting, election of officers and the presentation of association awards such as the Associate Member of the Year, the Annual Scholarship Awards and the Keith Ladd Leadership Award, followed by a buffet dinner and concluding with PBFAA’s renowned Casino Night.

The second day of the expo starts off with five seminar tracks covering technical sessions, business sessions, sales sessions and two hosted session tracks sponsored by Interlogix, and NAPCO Security.

PBFAA technical sessions cover diverse topics such as speciality fire detection, DVR/NVR selection, and understanding access control hardware.  

The business sessions include presentations on understanding your business numbers, building bridges with public safety and legislators, and updates on PA's HICPA law.

The sales sessions offer insights on how to identify your prospect’s pain, understanding interactive services and sales of video verification and other expanded RMR offerings.

The PBFAA will also offer a special "keynote" seminar session conducted by industry expert witness Jeffrey Zwirn titled, Alarm Science Bootcamp, which will educate attendees on the actions and inactions of their daily activities that can land them in court, trying to defend their business practices.

From noon to 4:00pm on June 7th the PBFAA will host its annual vendor exhibits featuring over 40 industry product and service providers. Intermixed throughout the vendor exhibits will be a networking luncheon for the attendees, along with a silent auction benefiting the Association’s scholarship program.  The exhibits conclude with the presentation of the vendor door prizes.

The association is based in Erie, Pa. For more information, call (800) 458-8512 (in state) or (814) 838-3093 (outside Pennsylvania), or email Info@PBFAA.com.
 

Leadership change at Stanley CSS

Byerly to departs; Marty Schnurr named new president
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05/16/2012

NAPERVILLE, Ill.—Tony Byerly, president of Stanley CSS North America and United Kingdom, is leaving the company, according to an internal announcement this week, Security Systems News has learned. Byerly will be replaced by Martin Schnurr, who is currently president of Stanley Hydraulic Tools.

Going video: New partnership links alarm industry, police, insurers

Group promotes more arrests, fewer claims through priority video response
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05/16/2012

ST. PAUL, Minn.—What may have seemed like a pipe dream to many in the security industry a few years ago—getting alarm companies and law enforcement to work together, then adding the insurance industry to the alliance—is now reality with the Partnership for Priority Video Alarm Response.

Universal Protection acquires guard-tracking technology

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05/16/2012

SANTA ANA, Calif.— Universal Protection, a $500 million guard company that also does security installation, on April 2 acquired Heritage Security Services of San Diego. It also acquired a guard-tracking technology that its CEO says is "game-changing."

Netwatch open for business in U.S.

Global monitoring company aims to tap pool of college grads in Boston
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05/16/2012

MEDFORD, Mass.—Netwatch, an international monitoring company that uses remote video detection and personalized audio warnings to thwart would-be burglars, has expanded to North America by opening an office here.

AT&T ‘bullish’ on security

The company says it’s poised to not only compete in the home security/home automation market, but grow it too
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05/16/2012

DALLAS—AT&T isn’t just entering the security space with trials here and in Atlanta this summer of its home security/home automation service. The telecom also believes it will be able to transform that space through such innovations as letting customers try out its new Digital Life product in its more than 2,000 retail stores around the country, an AT&T executive told Security Systems News.

Home energy where the money is—billions of dollars of it

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012

I’ve written before about how huge growth is expected in the home energy market, and now a new report is predicting growth that's even greater—in the billions by the end of this decade. It’s more evidence that security companies selling home automation along with security are on the right track.

The home energy management market will exceed $2 billion in annual revenue by 2020, according to a forecast by Pike Research, a market research and consulting firm that studies clean technology markets worldwide. The Pike report says the home energy management market was $93 million in 2011.

And, as one market analyst has told me, security companies are uniquely poised to take advantage of that growth because of their close relationships with customers.

In a news release, Colorada-based Pike Research predicts:

“The home energy management market will make steady progress over the coming eight years. It will be driven by government mandates, utility programs, and a growing number of consumers looking to manage their energy bills. Also, a combination of consumer desire to be more ‘green,’ home construction and retrofits with energy management objectives, and new technologies surrounding plug-in electric vehicles will help stimulate the market.”

The company also said: “HEM products can be viewed in five groups, or segments, along a continuum that moves from paper bills (a mailed statement from the utility showing a customer’s energy usage as it compares to households nearby), through standalone HEM systems, which include some device-level tracking and automated device control capabilities, up to networked HEM, comprising auto-pricing response capabilities, demand response (DR) load control, and home automation controls. Of these, networked-HEM revenue will see the strongest growth (76.8 percent CAGR), as utilities attempt to drive volume sales of networked HEM systems in order to make DR and time-of-use pricing schemes feasible.”

Leading an integration company: Tips and stories at PSA-TEC 2012

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012

I arrived late in the afternoon yesterday in Westminster, Colo. for one of my favorite events of the year, PSA-TEC.
 
The conference,  which started on Sunday and runs through Friday, was well underway when I arrived. Lisa Cole Miller, PSA Security Network marketing director said attendance is up about 10 percent over last year with more than 65 integrator companies here. (Some of those companies send up to 10 employees.) In addition, there are consultants, end users, and more than 40 vendors exhibiting on a show floor here.

“When you think about it, it’s a bargain,” Miller said, “For $500, you get breakfast and lunch, four days of classes, a trade show and parties.”

I arrived in time for PSA Security CEO Bill Bozeman’s presentation “What every integrator needs to know about being an effective executive.”

This class is part of the PSA Leadership Institute, which PSA launched in October at the PSA Convention in Puerto Rico. Here’s a story with details about the program.

It was the end of the day and Bozeman spoke for more than an hour about the highlights of the business book “The Effective Executive,” which was written 40 years ago by Peter Drucker.

I’m not one for long presentations—but Bozeman is a good speaker. Ever hear an engaging preacher give a good sermon? He’s got a little bit of a preacher’s cadence, and he tells some pretty funny stories too.

There were about 50 integrators and a few vendors in the room for his presentation. Bozeman’s clearly taken to heart one of Drucker’s tenets: “if you’re going to call a meeting, make if effective.”

Highlights of the talk included:

—“Manage yourself.” To lead you’ve got to show discipline—show up on time, have passion for what you’re doing.” Bozeman told a story about visiting a PSA member who’s business wasn’t going well. Bozeman said he was not surprised that business was bad when he visited the office.

“The shades were drawn, there was no light, the owner was walking around [hunched over, with his hands on his forehead, looking like the sky was falling]. And the employees were doing the same thing—walking around like zombies. It was the most depressing place I’ve ever seen.”

—Drucker said he never, in 45 years, came across a single, natural executive who didn’t have to learn how to be an effective executive. It’s something you need to work on.

—Identify company objectives, how you spend your time, and don’t let people waste your time. Focus on the positive and motivating your people.

Pierre Trapanese, owner, Northland Control Systems, as an example of effective executive. Trapanese (who will be speaking at the conference today and who spoke at TechSec in 2010,  bought a small integration company “that needed  a lot of work” Bozeman said and turned it into a fast growing company.

“Through leadership and vision, he’s grown that company beyond what [anyone] thought was possible,” Bozeman said.  Recently, Trapanese chose an annual goal for the company. “This year we’re going to have fun,” is what he said, according to Bozemen. “He’s got people knocking down his doors wanting to work there, and he doesn’t pay the highest salaries in the areas.”

—Manages to peoples’ strengths, and surround yourself with people who have strengths that you don’t possess.

—Veto hiring anyone with substance abuse problems or who’s dishonest in the least.
  
—Read the fine print, hire legal counsel.
—“Don’t take pride in being King Kong… become more visionary and less the doer.”

Time to head over to the conference. There’s an M&A panel at 8, followed by a panel of successful integrators  and fast-growing integrators, a panel on market drivers, and one on social media. I’ll have more tomorrow.

Report: G4S to shed some operations for $174 million

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Monday, May 14, 2012

Mega-security company, G4S—which does systems integration, guards and monitoring— has done a lot of acquiring in recent years domestically and some selling abroad.   According to a Reuters report this morning, it’s about to do some more selling—but not in North America, in Denmark.

The report says says G4S is preparing to sell its “alarm centres in Denmark” I’m assuming “alarm centres” are monitoring operations, but guess they could possibly be alarm installation companies. I’ll get some clarification on this.

The report says G4S will keep its guard operations in Denmark. “Several private equity firms” are reportedly interested in buying and the deal is expected to be work “more than 1 billion Danish crowns ($174.13 million), “

Here’s some more from the story:

“Security firm G4S is preparing to sell a large part of its Danish operations in a deal that is expected to be worth more than 1 billion Danish crowns ($174.13 million), Danish financial daily Borsen said on Monday.

Borsen cited banking and legal sources familiar with the matter as saying that G4S was close to a sale of its alarm centres in Denmark, but would keep its Danish uniformed guards business.

“G4S has not been able to earn decent money from the infrastructure part (of the business) in Denmark so now they are selling it,” a source representing a potential buyer told the newspaper.

The paper said that several private equity firms were interested in the operations that G4S was selling. The paper said the sale would be similar to divestments of operations in Norway, Poland and Sweden that G4S has carried out after the company failed last year to acquire Danish outsourcing firm ISS in a 5.2 billion pounds ($8.4 billion) deal.
In March, G4S said it would return to targeting emerging markets, including Brazil, China and India, following the failed ISS takeover attempt. ($1 = 5.7429 Danish crowns) ($1 = 0.6212 British pounds) (Reporting by John Acher; Editing by Helen Massy-Beresford)”

Xandem TMD sensing technology ‘sees through walls’

Startup has piqued the interest of some integrators
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05/11/2012

SALT LAKE CITY—Xandem is a startup company that’s attracted some mainstream media attention and technical awards, as well as interest among some security integrators who think the company’s motion sensor system may solve some common security problems.

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