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General Monitoring Services

Central station vet gets TriStar off the ground

The California-based central, in operation for barely a year, has a leader at the helm who’s familiar with the West Coast market
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02/26/2014

CORONA, Calif.—TriStar Monitoring, based here, may be a newcomer to the central station space, but the company’s president and founder, Tim LeBlanc, is anything but.

IQ Certification and public perceptions about the industry

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Monday, August 19, 2013

Over the course of June and July, fourteen companies renewed their eligibility with IQ Certification, an installation quality certification program for alarm companies. The group of re-certifiers includes COPS Monitoring, based in Williamstown, N.J., Monitoring America Alarm Co-op of Tulsa, Okla., and General Monitoring Services, based in Huntington Beach, Calif.

Founded in 1997, the IQ Certification Program, headquartered in Erie, Pa., is based on one fundamental principle: security systems that are properly designed, professionally installed, feature the best equipment, and are monitored correctly tend to function free of failure or false alarms. A fifth component of a sound security system, according to the website, is providing users with education and training as well. 

To earn IQ Certification, alarm companies must undergo a rigorous evaluation by the IQ Certification Board, which is comprised of law enforcement, fire, state regulatory and insurance industry representatives, the program’s website notes. The certification standards are extensive and specific. The website features a code of ethics and PDFs on program bylaws and polices and guidelines. To become re-certified, companies must demonstrate to the board on an annual basis that they meet the required standards.

The expansion of a program like IQ Certified, first and foremost, reflects the industry’s dual commitment to mitigating flaws, such as false alarms, and making users better attuned to managing their systems. The guidelines expounded on the website also demonstrate a concerted push for cohesiveness and standardization in the interest of quality and functionality.

Interestingly enough, I began learning about the IQ Certification Program mere minutes after reading an opinion piece, published on MSN Money, titled “14 reasons monitored home security isn’t worth it.” The article, while somewhat disconcerting, is nevertheless worth a read, if only because it offers a window into certain non-industry attitudes about home security.

Yes, the opinion piece is critical of monitored systems, often unduly so. The tone is one of exasperation and hyperbole. But few things can better counteract the negative perceptions detailed in this piece than a rigorous, quality-focused program like IQ Certification, an organization aimed at rectifying problems rather than dwelling on them.