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video surveillance

Video and analytics moving further toward the perimeter

Intelligent devices and video surveillance are becoming important components of perimeter security, and could drive growth in that segment
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12/18/2013

ENGLEWOOD, Colo.—The growing trend of deploying video surveillance and analytics devices for perimeter security is showing no signs of abating.

Global production of security products worth $23.4 billion

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11/12/2013

LONDON—Production of security products, at factory gate prices, was worth $23.4 billion this year, according to a new report from Memoori.

Chamber installs security cameras to educate public

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11/06/2013

LOS GATOS, Calif.—Four surveillance cameras are now in place at the Los Gatos Chamber of Commerce.

Diebold secures Central American gold mine

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11/04/2013

NORTH CANTON, Ohio—Diebold, Inc. has installed video surveillance, access control, intrusion detection and perimeter monitoring at one of the world’s largest gold mines, the company announced Oct. 31.

Pivot3 gets $14m infusion

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10/30/2013

AUSTIN, Texas—Pivot3’s new $14 million credit facility will propel the storage provider’s move into bigger deals that involve “thousands and thousands of cameras,” Olivier Thierry, Pivot3 CMO, told Security Systems News.

IQinVision, exacqVision secure Community Health Network

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10/30/2013

SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, Calif.—The Indianapolis-based Community Health Network recently installed an exacqVision-IQinVision video surveillance solution, IQinVision announced Oct. 29.

Integrators get a sales edge with edge storage

More manufacturers offering video recording on the camera itself
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09/27/2013

Steve Gorski has experienced some déjà vu at recent trade shows. As GM Americas for Mobotix, a network camera company that takes a decentralized approach to storage, Gorski has been evangelizing the benefits of storage onboard the camera for a while.

Skyhawk Security completes acquisition

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Wednesday, September 25, 2013

In another illustration of the industry’s evolution, Baton Rouge La.-based Skyhawk Security, which offers remote video monitoring, IP camera systems and access control systems for commercial customers (most in Louisiana, but some as distant as California), acquired local IT firm Big Networks. With the purchase of the firm’s assets and intellectual property, the Skyhawk Group (the name of the merged company) will have an in-house IT unit to supplement its security offerings.

The move establishes an interesting hybridized security company in the Louisiana capital. Brett Lofton, one of three managing members with Skyhawk, said the acquisition, in addition to bringing in an “in-house IT decision maker,” also presents some major cross-selling opportunities, particularly with respect to some of the clients the company inherited through the Big Networks buy.

Lofton said some of these accounts could potentially be a boon to Skyhawk’s security business. “We’ll certainly be cross-selling and trying to get in front of them to talk about [our security offerings],” Lofton noted, adding that this applies especially to companies with guards—customers who could find the security services palatable. Commercial customers may find value in the prospect of replacing or supplementing nightshifts with video monitoring, Lofton said.

Skyhawk also plans to explore cross-selling its hosted access control service, which Lofton believes is gaining traction. It will be interesting to follow what kind of role video monitoring and access control play in the company’s primary near-term plan: organic growth—much of which could be fueled by business in its own backyard. Stay tuned for more on Skyhawk’s plans and near-term goals in Louisiana and beyond.

TrendNet: A Cautionary Tale?

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Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Hundreds of TrendNet customers found out the hard way that products they purchased, billed as home security cameras, weren’t all that secure. In January 2012, a hacker was able to breach TrendNet’s website, circumvent security credentials and access some 700 live-camera feeds monitoring inside customers' homes. Many of the videos were then disseminated on the Internet, a curious fact by itself in light of the complaint filed by the Federal Trade Commission, which said security flaws in the cameras allowed for the “unauthorized surveillance of infants sleeping in their cribs, young children playing, and adults engaging in typical daily activities.” The online community continues to recover from the trauma of being exposed to such tedium.

But for obvious reasons, customers were unnerved. The FTC wasn't happy either. The oversight committee’s complaint alleging that TrendNet misrepresented its software as secure and failed to adequately protect its customers resulted in a settlement, which was reached last week, according to multiple reports.

The story reached mainstream news. Unsurprisingly, it’s on the alarm monitoring industry’s radar as well, as I discovered in a short conversation with Stephen Doyle, executive vice president and CEO of CSAA. Doyle said he just returned from an Alarm Industry Communications Committee meeting in which 65 industry members were briefed by an industry lawyer on the legal ins and outs of the TrendNet snafu.

In terms of pertinence to the industry, the case seems fringy in some respects, relevant in others. It’s true, after all, that TrendNet cameras are unattached to alarms, and designed specifically for remote monitoring of homes via smartphones and other mobile devices. But it's relevant to the industry insofar as it deals with a few topics in the forefront of people's minds.

One of those topics is the viability and security of do-it-yourself monitoring systems. Another is cloud security, a topic that stands to grow in significance with the spread of IP panels, and as more companies migrate information and services to the cloud. Whether a company’s data becomes more or less secure when it’s transferred to the cloud is a hot-button industry debate with little consensus. Cloud adoption is likely to expand, but that doesn’t mean there won’t be skeptics. Either way, the TrendNet case perhaps intensifies the debate.

At TechSec 2014, Jeremy Brecher, VP of technology, electronic security at Diebold, will tackle some issues in this vein as part of the educational program, while also exploring ways security companies can thrive in an increasingly cloud-based environment.

Physical security market to reach $85 billion by 2018

New applications for video surveillance, biometrics and access control expected to drive growth in North America
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09/10/2013

PUNE, India—Demand among government agencies, large enterprises and tech establishments is expected to push the global physical security market, currently worth about $55 billion, to a value of $85 billion by 2018, according to a new report by the research company MarketsandMarkets.

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