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The value of an IP address

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Monday, August 5, 2013

As promised in my last blog, I’m going to touch on another service discussed in Ken Kirschenbaum’s new technology seminar, held last Friday, that could offer some significant benefits to monitoring companies.

The company, called Keep Your IP, is an IP forwarding service that allows dealers to retain their IP addresses, giving companies the ability to move from one central station to another without sacrificing the value they’ve built within their organization. Davin Roos, president of Keep Your IP, discussed several benefits of maintaining IP continuity. The crucial word? Control.

If, for instance, a dealer wants to partition some accounts, or even sell the entire organization, the fact of selling to a company that uses a different central station can devalue the sale, Roos explained. Having your own IP address (and, by extension, your own server) can help companies avoid incurring costs that result from the man hours required to make necessary changes. Roos added that the company is working with some of the major central stations to bundle packages that feature the service to dealers.

Some additional benefits for dealers include having the luxury to move central stations if a current one is under-performing, greater RMR consistency (especially during times of economic crisis), and the freedom to make changes after a central station switches their Internet service provider. 

Yesterday is gone, tomorrow is here: Notes from the webinar

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Thursday, August 1, 2013

Earlier today I listened in on a technology webinar, hosted by Ken Kirschenbaum, an industry attorney, that featured several voices both in the industry and in intersecting fields. Many of the speakers are at the forefront of technological innovation as it pertains to the central station space, so naturally the discussion dealt primarily with how to stay competitive by leveraging new technology that can improve retention and carve out new sources of RMR.

A recurring theme of the talk, unsurprisingly, was the emergence of the cableco and telecom giants, and what the competitive implications are with respect to their entry.

In 10-minute intervals, panelists presented commentary on a range of products and services. Some were pretty compelling, not only from a novelty standpoint, but also because many of the products seem like they could have some allure for monitoring companies and their distributors.

One of the more non-traditional services was presented by John Hoffe, president and CEO of Linked24, a product suite with several applications for mobile devices. Designed for dealers, the service features a GPS locator which, depending on the mobile device, can report an updated location of a loved one every three minutes. But that may actually be the company’s least buzzworthy product.

Another offering from Linked24 is its “Safe Text” service, which monitors incoming and outgoing messages for anything untoward, such as “inappropriate language and acronyms,” according to the website. If it detects any one of more than 750 pre-selected words, the text is uploaded to a customer portal for review. It’s a helicopter parent’s dream, and, brave new world though it is, it’s tough to imagine this product won’t find a home somewhere. But we’ll have to wait and see if that home will be among the dealer networks of wholesale monitoring companies.  

That’s not all. There’s also an “Emergency Shake” product that allows a customer in dire straits to open a Linked24 application then shake or drop their phone, whereupon a camera is engaged to shoot a 10-second video clip. The administrator of the account is then automatically notified.

Some of these offerings may come across as a bit intense from a personal privacy position, but there’s no question some have the potential to thwart an unforeseen problem, particularly the phone shake feature. And, with the mobile surge in full swing, it’s not unrealistic to imagine dealers giving strong consideration to products of this ilk to help boost their RMR.

It dawned on me just now that I’ve alluded to one speaker thus far, despite the fact there were several more who offered insight and product commentary that were more than worthy of mention. In my next blog or two, I’ll be sure to highlight the most resonant points offered by some of the other knowledgeable panelists. Stay tuned...

World Wide Security acquires CCTV Security

Deal brings blue chip clients, potential to reach $10m revenue in 18 months
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07/31/2013

GARDEN CITY, N.Y.—World Wide Security, a full service security company based here, announced July 30 that it has acquired CCTV Security, a systems integrator based in Long Island City, N.Y.

Florida company succeeds with unique business model

Just one branch of Crime Prevention Security Systems is a Guardian dealer while the company’s main office operates independently
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07/31/2013

GAINESVILLE, Fla.—Founded by a microbiologist and a special education teacher, Crime Prevention Security Systems wasn’t your typical security company when it began 38 years ago and it still stands out from others today.

Monitor America earns UL listing

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07/30/2013

MOONACHIE, N.J.—Monitor America, a provider of security monitoring services technology, based here, has earned UL certification for meeting all required criteria, according to a company statement.

UCC hires former CVS leader

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07/30/2013

SAN ANTONIO—United Central Control, a provider of monitored security services based here, has hired James Beaty, formerly the general manager of central station operations at CVS, to head its business development initiatives, according to a company statement.

Missouri city the latest to outsource false alarm services

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Wednesday, July 17, 2013

The trend of municipalities outsourcing false alarm collection services continues, and as in past instances, the most recent agreement involves Irving, Texas-based PMAM, a global IT firm with four U.S. offices and an office in Mumbai. Their slogan is “Around the World, Around the Clock,” so you can see why their false alarm tracking and billing services might appeal to cities hoping to nip the problem in the bud. 

According to an article from KSMU (Ozarks Public Radio) in Springfield, Mo., the police department in that city is the latest to do away with its in-house handling of false alarms, opting to transfer those duties to PMAM. Springfield Police Department dispatchers receive as many as 400 false alarm calls a month, the article noted.

Like any outsourcing move, the new arrangement saves resources, authorities say. In addition to being a drag on budgets, false alarms also stretch law enforcement in potentially harmful ways, sometimes preventing or delaying response to critical calls.

The advantage of outsourcing false alarm services to a company like PMAM is that, ideally, the IT giant has the capabilities to identify a false alarm, home in on the cause (an installation flaw or dated system is often the culprit), and then teach people how to avert future false dispatches, and the fines that eventually accompany them.

According to the article, the Springfield Police Department has received roughly 2,100 false alarm calls thus far in 2013. The city’s ordinance levies a civil penalty fee, between $15 and $50, for those who have at least four false alarms. The charges escalate with each additional violation, according to the article.

False alarms are both a fiscal and logistical drain on towns and cities. But some of the things that might mitigate false dispatches, including system upgrades and more regular maintenance, are not always at the forefront of many customers’ minds.

It seems that until there’s more public awareness of the problem, and more measured steps to cripple the problem at its roots, municipal bodies are going to continue seeking out IT behemoths like PMAM for false alarm damage control.     

Acquiring thy neighbor?

Best practices according to Jennings, Egan, Loud, Goldstein and Cerasuolo
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07/17/2013

YARMOUTH, Maine—One of the best ways for security companies to build density is to acquire a local competitor, but there also are potential pitfalls when doing business in your backyard, according to five security company executives who have experience with these kinds of transactions.

Doing your due diligence

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07/17/2013

YARMOUTH, Maine—When a bank considers making a loan to a security company it goes through a standard due diligence process, so if you’re a security company looking to acquire a competitor, “you should look for the same things that we look for in your business,” according to Jennifer Holloway, managing director in the Security Industry Group at The PrivateBank.

New options driving connected home growth

Home safety products top homeowners’ wish list of additional features
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07/17/2013

DALLAS—A survey of consumers by Parks Associates found that the more features homeowners have in a home control system, the more likely they are to recommend the system to family and friends.

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