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Morgan Hertel

TechSec 2017 Panel: Monitoring the next tech

Key figures in the monitoring industry present on technological trends
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03/15/2017

DELRAY BEACH, Fla.—The hot topics in the industry—drones and robotics, cybersecurity, the Internet of Things, big data and data mining—all impact monitoring centers, as well as integrators and end users.

The challenge of hiring

Visibility, having the right offering for applicants can be key
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02/16/2017

YARMOUTH, Maine—Many companies, of all sizes in the industry, face the difficulty of finding the most qualified and best fitting candidates to join their team. Security Systems News talked with a few of these companies to hear what the applicant pool looks like, what they look for in new hires and how they bring in the best talent.

CSAA looks for experts to form new tech standards

New standards apply to monitoring centers, PSAPs, manufacturers
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08/03/2016

VIENNA, Va.—CSAA is looking for subject matter experts on a variety of up and coming technologies to join its new Emerging Technologies Committee—a division of its Standards Committee—to help form new standards.

Morgan Hertel to focus on tech and trends in new role at Rapid Response

Communications pathways will be ongoing challenge for security industry
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05/18/2016

SYRACUSE, N.Y.—In his new role as Rapid Response Monitoring VP of technology and innovation, industry veteran Morgan Hertel intends to help Rapid leverage new and emerging technology in the monitoring space.

RFI goes with Rapid Response

Wilson: Rapid has agility and has tech resources to serve ‘integrator of future’
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03/09/2016

SAN JOSE, Calif.—To provide more customized services to its clients, RFI Communications and Security Systems plans to close its internal monitoring station and outsource its monitoring to Rapid Response.

Central station transformation

The IoT is pushing central monitoring stations to become more sophisticated. It requires significant investment in technology, development and staff to stay competitive
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07/15/2015

DELRAY BEACH, Fla.—The Internet of Things culture, where everything is connected, is changing the way people interact and the way business is transacted.

Centrals get social

Social media on the rise for many reasons
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07/30/2014

Social media may not be a major revenue generator at this point, but third-party monitoring stations are making more use of popular social media sites to reinforce traditional sales and marketing efforts, according to a group of executives from five well known third-party monitoring companies who spoke to Security Systems News for this report.

Monitoring in the IP age

Panelists at ESX discuss how central stations need to evolve to prosper in the age of IP signals
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07/09/2014

NASHVILLE, Tenn.—Good advice on running a central station was in no short supply at ESX. The show’s entire lineup of monitoring track seminars covered virtually every aspect of what it takes to thrive as a central station in 2014 and beyond.

Rapid Response to do $11.3m expansion, add 70 jobs

Meanwhile, on the West Coast, Rapid is wrapping up construction of its second monitoring center
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10/23/2013

SYRACUSE, N.Y.—Rapid Response Monitoring will begin an $11.3 million construction project next summer that will add 22,000-square-foot of space to its headquarters here, Morgan Hertel, VP of operations at Rapid, told Security Systems News.

Riders on the storm: Central stations take Sandy in stride

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012

The snowy remnants of Hurricane Sandy are still blowing across the ridges of West Virginia, but the worst is over for the Eastern Seaboard. Now the recovery begins. And as is the case with any natural disaster, preparation holds the key to the extent of the difficulties ahead.

The lesson—one that’s often learned the hard way—is that it pays to do your homework and have a backup plan in place. The monitoring industry prides itself on that, of course, a fact that was validated by a quick SSN survey of central stations in the Northeast after the storm. It showed that while Sandy packed a tremendous punch, the industry was ready to handle it.

Long Island, N.Y., was one of the areas hit hardest by the storm, with thousands of homes damaged and nearly 1 million customers left without power Monday night. Andy Lowitt, vice president of dealer relations for Hicksville-based Metrodial, said via email Tuesday that despite the horrific damage in the area, the central station weathered the storm.

“Lots of downed trees and power lines … 912,000 [on Long Island] without power today versus 934,000 this morning, so tons of customers with beeping keypads, smokes and carbons,” Lowitt wrote. “Our natural-gas generator powered our central from 3 p.m. yesterday until power was restored today around 2 p.m. We had some valiant efforts of operators making it in during the day yesterday. Most PDs and some FDs stopped responding during the overnight hours and at one point we had over 3,000 signals in queue.”

New Jersey was also pounded by Sandy, but COPS Monitoring in Williamstown was prepared and took it all in stride, according to Executive Vice President Don Maden.

“In short, we proactively re-routed a percentage of alarm traffic away from N.J. to other sites, and significantly increased staffing at our other four central station locations,” he wrote in an email Tuesday. “We had 100 percent uptime in N.J. with services, did not lose power, and handled nearly double the normal alarm traffic across our network of central stations yesterday. Today, as expected, was heavy with alarm activity as well. [Generators] kicked on due to a few power flickers, but the grid stayed up.”

Don Piston, vice president of sales and marketing for Dynamark Monitoring in Hagerstown, Md., also reported heavy alarm volume but said “we knew that was coming.”

“We did great. We got battered with AC power loss and low battery signals because of all the power outages, so the traffic was just huge,” he told SSN on Wednesday morning. “But we sailed right through. We had the staffing in place. It’s almost no news because we did everything we were supposed to do.”

Despite Sandy’s mammoth strength and reach, it didn’t cause a lot of damage in Syracuse, N.Y.—just 250 miles from New York City and the home of Rapid Response Monitoring. Morgan Hertel, vice president of operations, said Wednesday that at the height of the storm, “we were getting pizzas delivered by the local pizza place. [Sandy] really wasn’t a big deal. It was like business as usual.”

That might have been the case meteorologically, but it wasn’t the case when it came to alarm traffic. At the peak, “we were seeing well over 100 signals a second coming in,” Hertel said, adding that Rapid is well versed in storm preparation and had extra staffing in place.

“We’re back to normal shifts today,” he said. “The technology did what it was supposed to do, the people did what they were supposed to do, and quite honestly we couldn’t be happier with the result. We even saved a few lives along the way.”

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