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Cybersecurity

Cybersecurity on tap at SSN

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Friday, July 19, 2019

For the past few years here at SSN we have been paying more and more attention to cybersecurity and its role within physical security, looking at it from as many different security perspectives as possible — end user, consultant, specifier, commercial integrator, supplier — you name it and we’ve probably written about it!

With cybersecurity playing such a prominent role in physical security today, we have added a section on our site that is completely devoted to our cybersecurity coverage. The convergence of physical and IT security is happening, and what better place to stay up to date on the latest happenings in the cybersecurity space than right here at SSN.

Some of our recent cyber-related stories include a great piece from SSN Contributing Editor Lilly Chapa, who attended the recent SIAGovSummit, about how the federal government aims to modernize physical security practices. As she points out, government agencies intend to evolve their security approach to address changing technology, threats and budgets, including working closer with cybersecurity and IT professionals.

Another interesting story worth checking out is by SSN Managing Editor Ginger Schlueter, who spoke with Cyber Criminologist Dr. Peter Stephenson about the art of data forensics.

Plus, she will be attending Cyber:Secured Summit at The Westin Dallas Park Central, July 29-31, and providing full coverage of the event here on the site as well, which you can find by just clicking on the Cybersecurity tab at the top of the site.

Dive right in here.

Federal government aims to modernize physical security practices

Government agencies intend to evolve their security approach to address changing technology, threats and budgets.
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07/19/2019

WASHINGTON—The Security Industry Association’s 16th annual GovSummit in Washington, D.C. was jam-packed with sessions outlining the physical security challenges the federal government is facing and what the security industry can do to help address them.

Data forensics: time is of the essence

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07/03/2019

AUSTIN, Texas—Huge volumes — think terabytes, petabytes, exabytes, zettabytes, yottabytes and up into the quintillion bytes — of complex, digital data is constantly being generated and scattered into different physical and virtual locations such as online social networks, the cloud and personal network-attached storage units.

Infocyte and Solutions Granted partner

Enables MSPs to deliver comprehensive, cost-effective endpoint security solutions to small, mid-sized organizations
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06/18/2019

AUSTIN, Texas—Infocyte, a pioneer proactive threat detection and instant incident response (IR), has partnered with Solutions Granted, a master managed security service provider (MSSP), providing managed security solutions to the channel.

Cyber:Secured Forum helps heat up the Lone Star State

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Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Things are heating up here in the Lone Star State which means air conditioning bills are about to go up, water will be consumed by the gallons, the smell of sunscreen and sun block will be everywhere, but most importantly, it means the Cyber:Secured Forum will be here before we know it at The Westin Dallas Park Central, July 29-31.

Senior Technical Director for NSA’s Cybersecurity Threat Operations Center (NCTOC), David Hogue, will be taking the stage on July 31st, 11:30am to 1:30pm, keynoting about fostering innovation and public-private partnerships in cyber defense. 

“The NSA is one of the most forward-thinking security organizations in the world,” Joe Gittens, director of standards, SIA told SSN. “David Hogue has been a technical expert on many of the agency’s cybersecurity threat mitigation efforts and a lead researcher on a number of high-profile breaches, like the Sony Pictures hack.” 

Attendees can look forward to the following take-aways from Hogue: 

  • Principles on how NSA is approaching cybersecurity innovation
  • How the security industry can partner in this overall mission; and
  • Ways the industry can develop solutions for: managing gateways and cyber perimeters, hardening endpoints to meet best practices and standards, embrace comprehensive and automated threat intelligence and cultivate a culture of curiosity and innovation. 

 

“I believe there is not a better voice to educate our industry on the emerging threats that enemies are deploying to interfere with the ever-connected nature of our nation,” Gittens said. “Security battlefronts are constantly changing, and David’s presentation will offer rare insights into how partnership and innovation within the security industry can lead to increasing success in the public and private sectors.”

I look forward to seeing everyone at Cyber:Secured and taking lots of notes on what Hogue has to offer! 

 

Preliminary agenda released for Cyber:Secured Forum

Second annual summit hosted by ISC Security Events, PSA Security Network and SIA
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04/17/2019

DALLAS—ISC Security Events, PSA Security Network and the Security Industry Association (SIA) have revealed the preliminary agenda for the 2019 Cyber:Secured Forum, a conference connecting the worlds of cybersecurity, physical security and systems integration.

Cyber workforce shortcomings

As organizations and governments across the globe struggle to staff high-level cybersecurity positions, a new report finds that the U.S. government may have a bigger shortage than it realized.
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04/03/2019

WASHINGTON—There’s no denying it: the future is digital. Whether it’s Industry 4.0, the aptly-named industrial revolution that signals the rising influence of automation and data exchange in manufacturing, or the rise of cyberwarfare, the effects of which are yet to be fully realized, the clout of the Internet is growing exponentially and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future.

The door is open for IT integrators to enter the physical security market

A look at how and why IT integrators should get into security
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03/20/2019

BOULDER, Colo.—Disruption is creating rapid growth in the security market, as new technologies are introduced, new players are entering the arena and bringing solutions that are merging and blending technologies and industries.

AI coming to the aid of security-related applications

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Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Our May 2019 News Poll got me really thinking about Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML), and the possibilities. My previous AI-related thoughts have been around Watson, the IBM-created, question-answering computer system that answers in natural language, and robots, and how AI can take over the world one day, according to some! Spooky! But, I wanted to know if AI is a legit, practical application for security-related functions, so I scoured the internet and found some exciting and unique, currently deployed uses. 

Physical Security

According the to China Morning Post, AI is revolutionizing physical security in Asia. It can detect people acting out of the ordinary and flag them, and then transmit that information to a command center, where human operators can make an informed decision. Additionally, AI and high-definition cameras can work together to first communicate to a human that a smoke detector, for example, has been activated, with the cameras identifying the exact location of the fire. 

Financial Security

Shoplifting literally costs billions of dollars here in the United States, which trickles down to honest consumers who end up paying more for goods and services. Vaak, a Tokyo-based company, spent more than 100 hours showing their AI system closed-circuit television footage of honest shoppers and shoplifters. The system can now identify suspicious activity based on more than 100 aspects of shoppers’ behavior including gait, hand movements, facial expressions, clothing choices and even “restless” and “sneaking” behaviors. Store employees are alerted of suspiciousness via an app and they can decide what to do. 

Life Security

Paris-based startup, Pharnext, was founded by Daniel Cohen, who “mapped” the human genome and demonstrated it is possible to use Big Data and automation to speed up the processing of DNA samples. Today, Cohen is using AI to analyze and map the chain of reactions of disease in the body. With this information, he and his team are combining existing drugs, known as “repurposing,” to create therapeutic effects that each drug lacks on its own. His overall goal is to use existing medicines to treat all disease, preventing the design of new medicines. 

Cybersecurity

Post-doctoral research fellow at Stanford University, Dr. Srijan Kuman, is developing an AI method — REV2 — to identify online conflict using data and machine learning to predict internet trolling before it happens. (Trolling is an action by a person who posts inflammatory and often deceptive and disinformation online to provoke others to respond on pure emotion.) Kuman uses statistical analysis, graph mining, embedding and deep learning to determine normal and malicious behaviors. His method is currently being used by Flipkart, an online store, to identify fake reviews and reviewers, and he was able to accurately predict when one Reddit community will troll another. 

Be sure to check out our editor’s blog that talks about worldwide spending on AI systems to reach $35.8 billion in 2019, according to International Data Corporation. 

 

Congress introduces legislation to establish security standards for government devices

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Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Based on analyst firm Gartner’s research, 20.4 billion Internet of Things (IoT) devices will be deployed by 2020; that’s more than double the world’s population! Hackers tend to gravitate toward the weakest link in the security chain, and because more and more IoT devices have questionable defenses, they make easy targets. This has caused the U.S. government to take notice.

To date, there is no national standard for IoT security, leaving it up to each company to decide how they want to security their connected devices. So, on Monday, March 11th, the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives members introduced the Internet of Things Cybersecurity Improvement Act. If passed, this legislation would set minimum security standards for connected devices used by the government in an effort to prevent the federal government from purchasing hacker friendly devices. 

While the legislation won’t set security standards for all IoT companies—just the ones wanting to win federal contracts— it could provide a baseline of best practices for all connected device manufacturers to consider. 

Should the bill pass, here’s what would happen: 

  • Security standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), such as secure development, identity management, patching and configuration management, would be required; 
  • NIST would review every five years; 
  • All IoT venders selling to the U.S. government would have a vulnerability disclosure policy, allowing government officials to learn when the devices are open to cyberattacks.

 

Do you think this legislation would compel all connected device makers to adopt these security requirements or just the ones wanting to do business with the government? 

 

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