Does IQ Cert=ethics code?

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

BUFFALO, N.Y.--While ADT and others have called recently for the creation of a new industry code of ethics for door-to-door alarm salesman, Tim Creenan has urged the industry to take a look at IQ Certification, saying it provides guidelines and enforcement rules for alarm company sales people. (See page 12.)

Further, it provides a kind of "seal of approval" for companies that do follow ethical sales procedures. "The whole premise is that an IQ certified company will stand out from the others by agreeing to comply with a set of guidelines and standards," he said.

Creenan is the owner of Amherst Alarm, based here, and chairperson of the IQ Certification Board. Started by the NBFAA, but now an independent entity, IQ Certification was founded as a way to get companies to adhere to certain guidelines that help prevent false alarms.

To be IQ certified alarm companies must adhere to a code of ethics, and a series of guidelines governing selling, designing, installing and monitoring of alarm systems. Before a company receives certification, the board solicits information about the company from local law enforcement and fire authorities. Likewise, once a company is certified, its name is circulated to those same authorities.

Companies must renew certification annually, and their certification may be revoked for noncompliance. The IQ board will investigate any complaints it receives, and would take it on itself to investigate complaints reported by the news media, Creenan said.

He noted that Broadview Security requires all of its dealers to be IQ certified. "They have taken the stance that they are concerned about the quality of installations ... that they want to ensure that a certain standard is met by all of their dealers," Creenan said. "Broadview is a great example of a national company that sees the value in the IQ program."

For more information on IQ certification, visit